Gambia Energy Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) – Additional Financing Terms of Reference for consultancy services to NAWEC on Non-Revenue Water (NRW) reduction plan

Gambia Energy Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) – Additional Financing

Terms of Reference for consultancy services to NAWEC on Non-Revenue Water (NRW) reduction plan

Background

The Gambia is a fragile country that is in the process of a major political and economic transition following a 22-year long autocratic rule that left the country impoverished, highly indebted, and institutionally weak. In recent years, the Government of The Gambia (GoTG) has taken important steps to lay the foundations for democracy and set the country on a new development path. Responding to the need for climate change mitigation and adaptation, GoTG has developed the Gambia National Adaptation Plan of Action (NAPA), which provides a policy framework to address the impact of climate change at national and local levels. This Plan identifies the energy and water sectors as country priorities.

The National Water and Electricity Company (NAWEC) is the main provider of electricity, drinking water and sewerage services in the Gambia. While NAWEC has made significant gains in recent years on the electricity side of the business, water services have been struggling. While a restructuring exercise is underway to address NAWEC’s overall organizational, technical, and financial challenges, it is important to address the most pressing water services issues to complement this effort.

NAWEC provides water and sewerage services to urban areas and provinces with more than 100,000 residents. In urban areas, about 69 percent of the population has access to safely managed water, but the quality of services is poor due to frequent service outages, with some neighborhoods not receiving water for days, weeks or even months at a time. Investments in service expansion are not enough to meet growing demand, with urbanization growing at a rate of 4.5 percent a year. In addition, water quality is a challenge in terms of high levels of nitrates, iron, manganese and salinity in drinking water.

The main source of water resources in the Gambia is ground water. While the Gambia is endowed with ample water resources, the economic value of these resources is not fully exploited. NAWEC has drilled many boreholes in different areas of the country but most of them are not metered and some do not have the right size of meters, are outdated or damaged. Management of the water sector is somewhat fragmented. The Ministry of Fisheries and Water Resources (MFWR) is responsible for the overall management of water resources as well as for rural water supply and sanitation services, while NAWEC is the public utility responsible for provision of water supply and sanitation services in urban areas and provincial centres.

World Bank Support to the Gambia

The Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) additional financing, in the amount of USD 43 million, was approved by the World Bank Board of Directors on 29 June 2020. This project, which expands the scope of the parent GERMP, aims to improve NAWEC’s operational performance for both electricity and water services and will fund important investments in water infrastructure that can help address the water crisis in NAWEC’s service area.

The GERMP Additional Financing will provide essential support to NAWEC to address some of these challenges. The project plans to strengthen the utility’s functioning through a service contract covering both electricity and water; the introduction of water drinking modules in the information management system (IMS); training; and strategic studies on sanitation. A separate component will strengthen NAWEC’s planning on non-revenue water reduction; install retail meters and district metered areas (DMAs); introduce energy efficiency measures; rehabilitate storage tanks; finance new water connections; and improve water quality at selected water treatment facilities. Moreover, considering the current coronavirus pandemic, the project will provide emergency support to NAWEC to purchase IT equipment for staff; supply water to unconnected areas through borehole drilling and tanker trucks; purchase needed spare parts and equipment to ensure continuity of service provision; provide handwashing and hygiene kits to the population; and implement hygiene campaigns.
Addressing the Challenge of Non-Revenue Water (NRW)

The current NRW rate is estimated to be between 35% to 45% but this rate is very uncertain as NAWEC does not have a systematic way of measuring apparent and physical losses in its coverage zone. NAWEC does not have an NRW department or unit in its organizational structure. The leakages in the network are compromising the confidence that communities, regulatory officials, and the media place in NAWEC.

There are five main water treatments plants in the country. The treatment plants in the GBA are in a closed network with isolation valves in between the served areas of the network, supposed to help operations during peak periods. In addition, there are master meters serving as inlets and outlets to the treatment plants. Most of these meters are not operating, making the management of the water business challenging for the company without proper data acquisition and analysis.

Objective of recruiting a consulting firm.

The objective of this assignment is to help NAWEC develop its knowledge base on NRW and develop a plan for reducing NRW in its service area, with a focus on GBA. The firm to be recruited will provide continuous technical assistance (TA) to NAWEC and will produce several key services and products that should place NAWEC on a solid path to tackling its NRW. As much as possible, the firm should work closely with NAWEC staff as well as local engineers and technicians, to transfer knowledge and build capacity on NRW.

Scope of work of the consulting firm

The scope of work includes but is not limited to the following tasks:

Task 1: Situational Assessment (6 months)

The consulting firm will do an initial assessment of the NAWEC water business to develop a preliminary assessment of the dimensions of NAWEC’s NRW challenge. In so doing, the consulting firm should engage in extensive discussions with stakeholders, review existing data and studies, and draw on its knowledge of NRW trends around the world to place NAWEC’s situation into context.

 

Specifically, the firm will deliver the following.

  1. Institutional and Policy Framework

The goal of this task is to understand the enabling environment for the NRW activity.

Key activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  • Review previous water supply and NRW studies, policies, rules, and regulations where available.
  • Assess the appetite of NAWEC management and staff, policy makers and other key constituents (e.g., the regulator) to address NRW.
  • Undertake a review of national and local laws which govern water supply in the Gambia. This review should include asset standards and review these versus international standards. Document the potential impact of these standards on the NRW tasks detailed in these TORs.
  • Review the current organizational structure for dealing with NRW in terms of staffing, budget, and operational set-up (assets, equipment etc). Complete a skills review of engineering and technical staff at NAWEC regarding water operations and NRW. Clearly outline the strengths and identify gaps.
  • Review NAWEC procurement and supply chain arrangements with an eye to the equipment needed for successful NRW projects – document risks and identify solutions.
  • Review NAWEC asset management information including mapping of pipe infrastructure, understanding of pipe materials and specifications of meters
  • Document the impact of the current situation of water losses and commercial inefficiencies and their impact on customers, NAWEC partners, and NAWEC itself. Parameters to consider include:
    • health impacts of unreliable water supply for households
    • impact on businesses and hence the impact on the Gambian economy
    • coping costs of securing alternative supplies
    • morale within NAWEC resulting from these issues.
    • accelerated degradation of the pipes due to intermittent supply; (the cumulative effect of this on pipe asset life should be identified)
    • public/ government perception of NAWEC and impact on its “brand”.

The above parameters are indicative – the consultant is encouraged to consider other parameters as appropriate.

 

  1. Field Assessment

The goal of this task is for the consultant to start activities that aim to improve data accuracy and get an initial indication of priorities for NRW reduction. Extensive field work is expected to collect the raw data to approximate the baseline situation of physical losses. A key aspect of this work will be identifying core NAWEC staff with operational knowledge and experience who should become focal points in this work with the consultant.

 

Key activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  1. bi) Technical Information
  • Verify network diagrams, specifications, and condition data. Review information on network monitoring equipment (flow and pressure data).
  • Describe the current water production facilities including information on volume of water produced (m3/day and m3/year) and type of energy used (gravity/ pumped). Include information on the cost of producing drinking water at NAWEC.
  • Assess the plants inlet and outlet flow meters including type, size, installation, data transfer, chamber dimension and distance to any main fitting. Assess any other relevant meter information.
  • Assess the state of the distribution infrastructure and related assets and equipment. Assess the quality, material, length, and age of the network. Field visits and photographic evidence will be needed.
  • Collect data on actual pressure and flow in the network and set points at production locations. Pressure and flow should be logged over several weeks to understand the pressure profile and link with water production and operation of the network.
  • Determine the reservoirs in the network and the modalities for operating and maintaining them.
  • Assess the reservoirs inlet and outlet flow meters including type, size, installation, data transfer, chamber dimension and distance to any main fitting, as well as any other relevant information.
  • Review the leak detection equipment in the utility, if any, and make recommendations for the procurement of the most appropriate equipment to reduce water leakages.
  • Evaluate leakage repair data and determine the annual number of leaks repaired, differentiating them between leaks on service connections and main pipes, both for reported leaks and those identified by leak detection teams.
  • Evaluate any unauthorized consumption, including an estimation of the number of connections and volume consumed.
  • Examine pipeline replacement records as well as existing pipeline replacement plans.
  • Assess the availability of water supply against forecast demand and identify core system constraints.
  • Analyze what measures, if any, are in place for asset maintenance and provide recommendations as appropriate.

Task 2: Baseline Data and Summary report (6 months)

Drawing on the information collected from the preceding tasks, the consultant will prepare a detailed baseline and summary report of the NRW situation in NAWEC’s coverage zone. The report must include the following:

 

  • An International Water Association water balance of the performance for each of the NAWEC water treatments plants and standalone systems.
  • Estimate potential water demand savings through the implementation of an NRW (real losses) program involving leakage detection and pressure management across the following water balance categories:
    • Current annual real losses (CARL)
    • Unavoidable annual real losses (UARL)
    • Customer (post meter) usage
    • Estimate likely burst reductions and associated cost savings.
  • Review NRW (apparent losses) and consider:
    • Using IWA Water Balance tools and best practice methodologies, develop an estimation of NRW (apparent losses) due to:
      • inefficiencies in the billing process
      • unbilled authorized consumption and total volume of such consumption
      • unauthorized consumption and the annual volume of such consumption

 

  • The NAWEC water meter fleet. The report should review meter coverage, meter accuracy, and assess strategies to avoid apparent losses and minimize revenue losses for
  • A review of water metering for business and commercial customers to ensure that NAWEC is appropriately billing for water consumed by these high value customers.
  • A review of metered standpipe arrangements and identification of appropriate future policies and strategies.
  • Key indicators of NRW/ overview of headline NRW (real and apparent losses) figures. This information can be presented in an Excel spreadsheet or another format that is easy to follow.
  • Results of testing in pilot DMAs and analysis/ interpretation of results
  • Results of field tests on each of the aspects of the water balance such as: source meter accuracy, customer meter accuracy, illegal connections, household consumption patterns, nighttime consumption, night flow and pressure etc.
  • Results of bottom-up pressure leakage and time leakage field tests to identify what will happen when changes are made to time of supply or operating pressure or both calculations of improved estimations of the system input and output volumes.
  • Recommendations /guidance to NAWEC on improving network plans, updating customer information, leakage management, pressure optimization and any other improvements that are deemed necessary to monitor losses in these DMAs.

 

Task 3: Development and Installation of DMAs (18 months)

NAWEC currently has virtual DMAs that are not yet represented on a map or used during operations. Moreover, there is no identification of inlets and outlets master meters to monitor water losses. The night flow of these zones is also not monitored.

The consultant should assess the distribution network and advise on the demarcation of the network into functional DMAs in close consultation with NAWEC staff. NAWEC shall provide data if available otherwise the consultant will be responsible to establish this data.

In order to develop a solid baseline on NRW, the Consultant will be required to do the following:

  • Conduct an assessment to map the network and the assets to improve data collection, data management and analysis with the aim to improve operational efficiency.
  • Divide the served areas into hydraulic zones and identify the inlets and outlets of DMAs.
  • Determine the equipment to be used in the network such as leak detection loggers, antennas for communication and equipment for pressure optimization. Draw up technical specifications for this equipment.
  • A ranking of the hydraulic zones and DMAs in terms of priority for implementation, with justifications provided.
  • Assess the status of existing bulk water meters including age, sizing, block/faulty, duplicated accounts, and other issues in the meter park etc
  • Draw up recommendations on the needs for rehabilitating or replacing aging water infrastructure (pipe networks, network control valves, fire hydrants and air valves)

Task 4: NRW Plan and Options (6 months)

Drawing on the previous tasks, the Consultant should develop an effective NRW reduction plan (both real and apparent losses) that can guide NAWEC and its partners on practical actions to take to reduce NRW and sustain those gains. The plan should include, but not be limited to, the following:

  • Development of a NRW Strategy (real and apparent losses) for NAWEC. The strategy should document an agreed program of activities which should be implemented. The strategy documents will include:
  • Detailed Project Plan (Gantt Chart) and Resourcing Plan for the Implementation of an agreed NRW (real and apparent losses) Program
  • District Meter Design (DMA Maps) for the implementation of an agreed NRW (real loss) intervention, including
    • Suitable DMA split up of the network,
    • Appropriate metering required to implement water loss projects,
    • Logging and monitoring points throughout the network to ensure standards of service are secured,
    • Pressure management opportunities.
  • Procurement plan and draft tender documents

Specific documents shall be prepared by the consulting firm in collaboration with the PIU/NAWEC to include the needs of the client:

  • bills of quantities
  • technical specifications
  • technical designs
  • project cost estimates
  • preparation of technical elements of the draft RFQ/RFP and draft contract

 

  • Project Risk Register for each agreed NRW (real and apparent losses) intervention
  • Analysis of different options and contractual modalities for delivering the program of NRW management (both real and apparent losses). Options could include, but are not limited to:
    • performance-based contract with a private operator,
    • small-scale contracts with contractors or consultants to address stand-alone elements such as metering or billing,
    • in-house civil works done by NAWEC, or
    • some other modalities with or without the private sector.
  • Appraise the financial dimensions of different NRW options. The consultants will cost out the NRW-Reduction Program (real and apparent losses) and conduct an appraisal cost-benefit analysis and payback of the proposed NRW-Reduction Program (real and apparent losses)
  • Identification of the key performance indicators (quantitative) and best practices (qualitative) to be used by NAWEC in ongoing NRW management. (target setting should happen at a utility scale, at a treatment plant scale and at a district meter scale)
  • An assessment of the key strengths and risks that will hinder a successful NRW reduction program.
  • An overview of the capacity needs within NAWEC and how to meet them e.g., through new hires, external expertise, staff training etc. Propose changes to the organizational setup that could allow for a successful NRW reduction program
  • A preliminary assessment of the viewpoints and capacity of various stakeholders to support both the NRW reduction program and their willingness to work with the private sector (if this option is recommended)
  • NRW training program for NAWEC technical staff with the aim of improving technical know-how and continue the management of NRW over the long term.

Task 5: Training of NAWEC Staff (continuous, over the course of 24 months)

  • Drawing on the skills assessment conducted under Task 1, develop a set of learning and development goals for team members to support the implementation of the NRW Program (real and apparent losses)
  • Working with the Corporate Services Team in NAWEC, embed these learning and development goals into the NAWEC Staff Performance Management system.
  • Develop a series of training materials and courses to match the learning needs of the NAWEC Team. The courses should incorporate learning materials (such as lectures, written course notes, practical exercises and testing material) to assist different learning types.
  • Organize a series of seminars, workshops and infield training activities to sensitize and inform NAWEC technical staff on various dimensions of NRW (real and apparent). As an indicative number, 12 seminars a year should be the basis for planning. However, the exact number of workshops, topics and level of effort will be determined to align with the NRW Strategy and the assessed needs of NAWEC staff.
  • Provide NAWEC staff with publications, written materials, data, digital content and other resources to help enhance their knowledge on NRW.
  • Provide training on specialized software as needed and as appropriate.
  • Develop a system e.g., Share Point for documenting, sharing and archiving information with the NAWEC team

Required qualifications and experience:

  1. Experience of a firm:
  • Providing advisory in the area of urban water services management (being a core business) for at least 7 years.
  • At least 2 similar contracts for the last 7 years, each of such contracts shall include at least two of the following key activities:
  • Water Audit to determine physical and apparent losses
  • District metered area (DMA) management including hydraulic analysis of water distribution system and meter replacement plan
  • Data collection and analysis for water business
  • Experience with similar assignments in Sub-Saharan Africa will be an additional advantage.

 

  1. The Core Team of the consulting firm will have the following qualifications:
  • Team Leader: An experienced water engineer with a Civil Engineering degree or equivalent professional qualification in relevant discipline of engineering with at least 10 years urban water services management, service delivery improvement and program design/delivery, in developing countries, experience. Experience in coordinating across multi-disciplinary stakeholders, facilitation and communication skills are needed. Global experience of work in urban water utilities specially in NRW area in developing countries is strongly preferred.
  • NRW Specialist: A seasoned water professional with a relevant university degree and a strong and proven experience (at least 10 years) in NRW and leakage detection/reduction program design and implementation in water utilities. Experience in developing country contexts is strongly preferred.
  • Commercial Specialist: An experienced professional with a relevant university degree with a background in accounting, customer service, IT or a related field with at least 5-years’ experience in utility billing, revenue management, metering and managing customer databases. Experience in developing country contexts is strongly preferred.
  • Legal/ Institutional Specialist: An experienced professional with a relevant university degree and at least 5-years’ experience of working with water utilities to strengthen their technical and organizational functioning. Experience in capacity building, change management and stakeholder engagement would be important. Ability to advise on the institutional and legal feasibility of recommended actions is needed. Experience in developing country contexts is strongly preferred.
  • Research and Data Management Specialist: The team should include a focal point who will be responsible for managing data generated from the assignment, including developing the NRW database, producing progress reports, and preparing the final study. Strong research capabilities and excellent technical writing skills are required. The expert shall have a relevant university degree and 5 years of relevant experience.

Additional Information

  • The contract will be for a Firm, that will report to the PIU Coordinator of NAWEC in Banjul, The Gambia.
  • Selection of the Consultants will be conducted in accordance with the Consultants Quality and Cost-Based Selection (QCBS) method of selection, as outlined in the World Bank Procurement Regulations.
  • The selected firm must mobilize staff to be stationed for a significant time in Banjul, Gambia, during the duration of the field assessment and agreed periodic field visits during implementation.
  • The successful candidate will sign a lump-sum contract.

 

Assignment/Contract duration

The estimated start date is January 2022, and the contract duration is for 2.5 years. The estimated efforts is 23 staff months.

The Ministry of Petroleum & Energy Terms of Reference for the Review and Update of National Energy Policy, Strategies and Action Plan

The Ministry of Petroleum & Energy

 

 

 

Terms of Reference

 

for the Review and Update of National Energy Policy, Strategies and Action Plan

 

 

FINAL

 

 

September 2021

 

1.     Introduction and Background

In The Gambia, the electricity access rate is estimated around 60 % and more than 85% of households in The Gambia depend on traditional biomass to meet their basic energy needs. Therefore, increasing access to modern clean and affordable energy services for the population could have enormous multiplier effects such as reducing poverty, empowering women, generating opportunities as well as improving standard of living for the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

Currently, The Gambia energy sector is characterized by heavy dependence on traditional biomass fuels mainly for household consumption, and imported petroleum products for electricity generation and transport. Cognizant of the afore-mentioned situation, the Government of The Gambia is committed to improving the energy situation in order to spur economic growth. In 2005, the Ministry of Energy developed the National Energy Policy, Strategies and Action plan which was revised in 2014 with the overall objective of re-defining the sector strategic objectives. Since then, a number of developments have taken in the energy sector including the development of an electricity roadmap in 2015, which was updated in 2017 and recently in 2021 to reflect new market opportunities and guide the development of the electricity sub-sector in the short-,  medium- and long-term (2021 to 2040). There is strong need for the National Energy Policy to be consistent with the roadmap objectives.

It is against this backdrop that the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy is seeking the services of a consulting firm to review and update the National Energy Policy (2014) to reflect the recent changes and development in the sector especially in electricity, renewable energy, energy efficiency, domestic energy as well as petroleum sub-sectors. The review and update of the policy document would be carried out in consultation with relevant stakeholder institutions including the Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs, Ministry of Trade, Regional Integration and Employment, Ministry of Transport, Public Utilities Regulatory Authority, National Environment Agency, Department of Forestry, National Water and Electricity Company, Gambia National Petroleum Corporation, NGOs, Civil Society, Private Sector etc. The assignment will be funded through the Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) co-financed by the World Bank, the European Investment Bank and the EU.

 

2.     Objectives

 

The objective of the assignment is to support the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy to:

 

  1. Review the effectiveness of the existing energy sector policies, strategies, programs, and projects implemented since 2014.
  2. Develop smart policy measures for the electricity, petroleum, renewable energy, energy efficiency, and domestic energy sub-sectors as well as cross-cutting issues.
  • Update the energy policy and recommend key policy measures, strategies, and actions for effective implementation.

 

3.     Scope of Work

 

The scope of work covers the whole energy sector and will be conducted in phases. Phase one will conduct a thorough desk review of existing policies, plans, and programmes at both national and regional levels. Phase two will entail consultation with stakeholders, SWOT analysis of the energy sector. While phase three will focus on updating the National Energy Policy (2014), Strategy and Action Plan for the various sub-sectors.

 

  • Phase One:  Detailed Desk Review of Policies, Plan and Programmes

 

This phase will entail a detailed review of existing energy policies, strategic objectives, plans and programmes at both national as well as regional level to identify the existing gaps between the policies, plans, programs under the current situation and the policy, plans, programs needed to meet the sector objectives in terms of safe, secure, affordable energy and low carbon development. This phase is expected to last for a period of two weeks.

 

3.2 Phase Two: Stakeholder Consultation, SWOT Analysis of the Energy Sector

This phase will involve a detailed SWOT analysis of the energy sector and high-level consultations with relevant stakeholders. It also involves assessment and analysis of projects, and programmes undertaken in the last 10 years. The purpose of this assessment is to help draw useful lessons from the implementation of the projects and programs, as well as make recommendations to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy for future effective implementation of similar projects and programs.

 

This phase of the work is expected to last for four weeks. The consultants shall make a presentation of the findings to stakeholders in a Consultation Workshop.

3.3  Phase Three: Update of the National Energy Policy (2014) and re-define Strategy and Action Plan (2021-2030)

 

The third phase will mainly involve the update of the National Energy Policy (2014) Strategy and Action Plan. This should be informed by the outputs of Phase 1 and 2.

 

The consulting firm is expected to conduct the update of the energy policy and align it with the relevant regional (ECOWAS, AU etc.) and international energy policies and strategies (such as the SE4ALL, NDCs).

 

This phase is expected to be completed within six weeks. The consulting firm shall present draft updated policy, strategies, and action plan at a National Stakeholder Validation Workshop.

 

4.        Deliverables

 

For the purpose of this assignment, there will be four deliverables:

 

  1. Inception Report: This should be prepared and submitted after the inception meeting with the Ministry and shall outline the agreed methodology, workplan for the assignment, and detailed desk review of policies, plans and programmes in the energy sector and gap analysis. To be submitted two weeks after the inception meeting (draft and final)
  2. Detailed SWOT Analysis of the Energy Sector and Stakeholder consultation Report
  • Draft Updated National Energy Policy, Strategies and Action Plan (2021-2030)
  1. Final Updated National Energy Policy, Strategies and Action Plan (2021-2030): This final version of the updated policy shall be submitted two weeks after the Validation Workshop incorporating all comments

 

Draft reports for each deliverable (I-IV) shall be submitted via email to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. For each of the deliverables I, II, and IV, the consulting firm is required to submit 1 soft copy (in USB) and 5 hard copies to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy.

 

In addition, the consulting firm shall provide the slide packs for the Consultation Workshop and for the Validation Workshop to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy by email no later than 5 days prior to the respective Workshop.

5.        Duration of Assignment

The timeframe for the consultancy service shall be for a maximum period of 4 calendar months.

6.        Responsibilities of the Consulting firm

 

The responsibilities of the consulting firm will include the following:

 

  1. To carry out the assignment in the most professional manner desired.
  2. Be responsible for collecting all data and information required for the completion of the assignment.
  3. Be responsible for its own transportation, accommodation, and subsistence during stakeholder consultations and for the two workshops.
  4. Be responsible for the printing and binding and delivery of all reports as outlined in section 4 of this Terms of Reference.
  5. Prepare PowerPoint presentation of the relevant key deliverables and present this at the Consultation Workshop and at the Validation Workshop.
  6. Be responsible for addressing all comments received from stakeholders and providing a comments matrix describing how all comments have been addressed.

7.     Responsibilities of the Ministry of Petroleum & Energy (MOPE)

 

The responsibilities of MOPE will include the following:

 

  1. Facilitate and support the work of the consultant during the assignment (stakeholder consultations etc.)
  2. Provide all documents (policies, strategies, action plans, Acts, regulations etc.) related to the assignment
  3. Coordinate the logistical arrangements for the organization of the two workshops (stakeholder consultation and validation workshops) (i.e., send invitations). Prepare and submit budget to GERMP PIU for the organization of the workshops to cover the costs of venue, food and refreshments, printing of materials etc.)
  4. Provide timely comments on draft deliverables.

 

 

8.        Qualifications of the Consulting firm

The consulting firm must be incorporated in the Gambia (proof of business registration). The firm must have been in existence for at least five (5) years and have:

  • Proven experience in policy and strategy development in the Gambia and/or in the sub-region
  • Experience in the energy sector, locally and internationally
  • Experience conducting similar assignments for public sector institutions in the Gambia

 

The team should comprise of the following three (3) key experts with qualifications and experience outlined below:-

  • Team Leader/Lead Expert
  • Energy Economist
  • Public Policy Expert

 

  • The Team Leader

The Team Leader would coordinate the overall work, assure the coherence and quality of the services provided and lead the delivery of the content of the assignment. The team leader’s profile should have:

  • At least a master’s degree in public policy, economics, engineering, strategic planning, business administration or related field
  • At least 10 years professional experience in developing policies, strategies and action plans for the public sector
  • Experience in policy and regulatory aspects of energy
  • Experience in leading similar assignments
  • Ability to analyze, compile and synthesize, and present technical information
  • Ability to work effectively in a team environment
  • Excellent writing / presentation skills and fluent in English
  • Energy Economist
  • A master’s level degree in economics, finance, engineering, or the economics and energy related field
  • At least 8 years’ experience in energy policy, energy planning,
  • Ability to analyze, compile and synthesize, and present technical information
  • Ability to work effectively in a team environment
  • Excellent writing / presentation skills and fluent in English

 

 

  • Public Policy Expert
  • A master’s level degree in public policy, strategic planning, public administration or related field
  • At least 6 years postgraduate experience in public policy development. Experience in energy policy development is desirable
  • Ability to analyze, compile and synthesize, and present technical information
  • Ability to work effectively in a team environment
  • Excellent writing / presentation skills and fluent in English

 

 

  1. Reporting Requirements

The Team Leader/consultant team will report directly to the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. However, the consultant’s team will work closely with the Energy Division of the Ministry.

 

  1. Submission of Proposal

Interested firm should send separate technical and financial proposals in sealed envelopes marked “CONSULTANCY FOR UPDATE OF NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY, STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN (2021-2030)” and addressed to:

Permanent Secretary           

Ministry of Petroleum and Energy

Petroleum House, Brusubi Roundabout

Brikama Area Council

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST – Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) – Development of Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for the Distribution backbone phase II

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST – Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) – Development of Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for the Distribution backbone phase II

Please click the link below for more information.

REOI FOR ESIA -for phase II Distribution Backbone 23-02-21

THE GAMBIA ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT
TERMS OF REFERENCE 

For the Development of One Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
for Three 30 Kv Mv Transmission Lines with Associated MV T-Offs and Distribution Networks for NBR (Niumi – Jokadu) and URR North – Diabugu to Passamas and URR South – Basse Santa Su to Fatoto.

Please click the link below for more information.

TOR for ESIA

NATIONAL WATER AND ELECTRICITY COMPANY (NAWEC) ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY, LOAD MANAGEMENT AND RENEWABLE ENERGY OPTIONS Terms of Reference

NATIONAL WATER AND ELECTRICITY COMPANY (NAWEC)

ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY, LOAD MANAGEMENT AND RENEWABLE ENERGY OPTIONS

Terms of Reference

Background

The Gambia is a fragile country that is in the process of a major political and economic transition following a 22-year long autocratic rule that left the country impoverished, highly indebted, and a in a very fragile state. The Government of The Gambia (GoTG) has taken important steps to lay the foundations for democracy and set the country on a new development path. Responding to the need for climate change mitigation and adaptation, GoTG has developed the Gambia National Adaptation Plan of Action (NAPA), which provides a policy framework to address the impact of climate change at national and local levels. This Plan prioritizes the energy and water sectors as country priorities.

The energy sector, particularly the National Water and Electricity Company (NAWEC) has implemented a number of measures to increase generation capacity, improve supply and efficiency, increase electricity access, and reduce transmission and distribution losses. Thereby contributing to debt reduction. However, NAWEC faces technical, organizational, and financial challenges and remains financially unviable, with high electricity costs, continuing financial losses, and high debt.

Management of the water sector is somewhat fragmented. The Ministry of Fisheries and Water Resources (MFWR) is responsible for the overall management of water resources as well as for rural water supply and sanitation services, while NAWEC is the public utility responsible for provision of water supply and sanitation services. While the Gambia is endowed with ample water resources, the economic value of these resources is not fully exploited.

Urban water supply, which is under NAWEC’s responsibility, is in crisis. In urban areas, about 69 percent of the population has access to safely managed water, but the quality of services is poor due to frequent service outages, with some neighborhoods not receiving water for days, weeks or even months at a time. Preoccupied by emergency measures to contain the water cuts, NAWEC has not been able to extend services in urban areas at a time when urbanization has been growing at a rate of 4.5 percent a year, and many areas still lack access to water.

World Bank Support to The Gambia

In 2018, The World Bank initiated the Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project. The Project Development Objectives (PDOs) are to improve the operational performance of NAWEC and improve the capacity of NAWEC to dispatch variable renewable electricity. This project is intended to support the country’s first utility‐scale solar PV plant, upgrades to the T&D infrastructure needed to absorb variable energy and imports, and extension of the distribution backbone throughout the country. The World Bank is now preparing to provide additional financing (AF) to this project.

The proposed AF will allow the project to meet the PDOs and increase the Project’s developmental impact. The AF will address three issues: (i) a funding gap for Component 2 of the original Project; (ii) scale up investments in metering and energy efficiency; and (iii) address the funding gap for sector turnaround activities, which in the case of the water sector, represent a quick response to the current water crisis through targeted interventions. These actions would include reforms related to NAWEC’s financial and commercial performance, measures to improve NAWEC’s ability to reduce losses related to non-revenue water (NRW), actions to improve the efficiency of water pumping systems, storage and water treatment processes; and strategic studies for water, sanitation and energy and capacity building for NAWEC’s water staff.

A key element of the AF is a comprehensive energy audit of the water operations of NAWEC  in the Banjul urban area to identify opportunities to improve energy efficiency, implement cost-effective renewable energy resources, and reduce operating costs, consistent with global best practice, and to increase NAWEC’s capacity for delivering water and sanitation services. The AF will also identify options for developing a sustainable financing mechanism for investments in energy efficiency and NRW reduction in the water operations of NAWEC throughout the country.

The NAWEC System in the Banjul Urban Area

The following information on the NAWEC System in the Banjul area is provided in Annex A. It includes:

  • Map of the system
  • List of borehole pumps
  • List of stand-alone boreholes
  • Coordinates of all boreholes
  • List of tanks

NAWEC has not assessed the energy efficiency of its water operations, but it is recognized that these operations are inefficient due to the age of its pumping inventory and other equipment, inadequate maintenance, and limited attention to efficiency improvement. Also, NAWEC loses an estimated 33 to 50 percent of the water it produces, either through physical losses in the distribution network or through commercial losses due to faulty meters, poor billing practices, and illegal connections. In addition, NAWEC does not have enough bulk water meters and thus cannot accurately measure water production and distribution through its network, hence creating the need for district metered areas (DMAs). NAWEC does not have a functioning geographical information system (GIS) to manage its assets; a hydraulic model to monitor water flow; and hydraulic zones that could help it deliver water in an organized and systematic way.

Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing Operating Costs

The energy consumption of the water operations of NAWEC in the Banjul urban area is very high. These costs contribute to its financial losses, unreliable service, and weakening institutional autonomy. Promoting energy efficiency is a key objective of the World Bank’s Additional Financing of the Project.

It is believed that, since much of the equipment in the NAWEC System was installed many decades ago, it is likely to be inefficient. Also, since the system has probably undergone many changes over the years, the pumping system configurations are not likely to be optimized. The World Bank’s experience with water supply, distribution and treatment systems has demonstrated that large savings in energy consumption and costs, as well as many co-benefits including reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, are achievable with a formal approach for energy management. Energy and cost savings measure identified in prior World Bank projects include:

  • Pumps and pumping systems operations: (a) replace inefficient pumps; (b) install variable frequency drives; (c) utilize gravity-fed systems instead of pumping; (d) optimize pumping system operation; (e) improve maintenance.
  • Water loss management technologies: (a) leak reduction (b) pressure management.
  • Wastewater treatment: (a) improve efficiency of anaerobic digestion and aeration equipment; (b) use efficient activated sludge process; (c) reduce wastewater with reuse and recycling; (d) generation and use of biogas from wastewater treatment processes.
  • Load Management: (a) schedule pumping operations during off-peak electricity periods; (b) use capacitors for power factor correction; (c) utilize storage capacity of reservoirs to reduce peak loads on the electricity system
  • New technologies: (a) implement supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) software; (b) install smart pumps; (c) automated meter reading
  • Renewable energy options: (a) small-scale hydropower; (b) rooftop solar PF; (c) solar pumps; (d) floating solar PV plants on reservoirs.

Objective

The overall objective of this assignment is to conduct a detailed energy and water audit of the NAWEC water supply, distribution and treatment system in the Banjul urban area to identify, assess and recommend opportunities for improving energy efficiency and load management and implementing renewable energy options.

Scope of Work

The Consultant shall apply its know-how and expertise in energy and water audits, using international best practice, to:

  • document in detail the NAWEC water supply, distribution, and treatment system in the Banjul urban area;
  • create a robust baseline of water and energy use based on a survey of actual operating conditions;
  • establish detailed data on electricity and water-use patterns,
  • Identify the major energy-intensive equipment and systems;
  • identify and assess potential for optimization of electricity use patterns,
  • create a list of specific energy efficiency and water savings measures,
  • define the opportunities for cost savings and reduced power curtailment (blackouts or brownouts) through load management by shifting large pumping operations from peak to off-peak electricity use periods;
  • Identify opportunities for utilization of renewable energy, solar PV especially;
  • identify and assess potential for generating power in wastewater treatments plants, gravity lines, the raw water canals, solar collectors on the roofs of filtration plants and other buildings (or any other possibility), and
  • identify the investment requirements and project paybacks for the opportunities for improved efficiency and cost savings.

The Consultant shall conduct the following tasks:

 

Task 1 – Project Inception and Preliminary Assessment

This Task shall focus on identification of data availability and a preliminary identification of the opportunities for energy efficiency improvement, load management, and renewable energy deployment.

The Consultant shall conduct the equivalent of a “walk-through” assessment of the NAWEC water operations in the Banjul urban area. It is anticipated that the Consultant shall conduct a one to two-week site visit to the headquarters and major parts of the system and shall identify the available data from existing sources including, but not limited to:

  • layout of the system and all of its major components (reservoirs, pumping stations, pipelines, treatment facilities, etc.)
  • main pumping stations
  • pipelines – length, capacity, age, etc.
  • reservoirs – capacity, flows
  • identification of major energy using equipment – capacity, age, operating hours, etc.
  • electricity consumption – total and for major pumping stations and other major energy consuming equipment
  • peak loads – total and for major pumping stations and other equipment
  • electricity tariffs (if internally billed to the water operations by the electricity operations) – peak and off-peak tariffs, time of use tariffs, energy charges per kWh, demand charges per kW, power factor fees, etc. as appropriate
  • electricity bills (or payments/transfers from the water operations to electricity operations) – total and for major components of the system
  • Operation and maintenance procedures and costs
  • Potential sites for generating hydropower from water flows and for establishing solar PV power plants on rooftops and reservoirs
  • Opportunities for using solar PV pumps.

Based on this information, the Consultant shall conduct a situation analysis that will identify:

  • Additional data that may be needed to develop a detailed baseline
  • Needs for equipment replacement
  • Preliminary identification of energy efficiency opportunities
  • Preliminary assessment of load management options
  • Identification of possible opportunities for renewable energy
  • Detailed definition of measurements to be undertaken and instruments to be used.

The consultant shall prepare an Inception Report describing all of the above findings. The Consultant shall define (with modifications and refinements as appropriate) the scope of work and task descriptions for the subsequent Tasks in more details than those originally presented in the Consultant’s proposal for this assignment.

Task 2: Identify and Assess Energy Efficiency Opportunities

The consultant shall carry out an energy efficiency audit that will include collection and analysis of technical and financial data on the NAWEC system, including bulk water supply, filtration plants, water trunk mains, distribution pipelines, and sewage treatment plants. The technical data collection will include field measurements as defined in the proposal and refined during the Inception Task. The Consultant shall develop a detailed baseline of historical energy consumption and peak loads, equipment inventory including technical characteristics of pumps, energy use (kWh) and peak load (kW) for each major facility, electrical, mechanical and process systems, physical losses in the transmission and distribution networks, electricity use and bills/transfers, and operation and maintenance costs. The purpose of the baseline will be to identify the most energy intensive equipment and processes, their specific energy consumption (kWh/m3) and contribution to total costs, and potential areas of energy and water savings.

The assignment will include:

  • Data collection (document and data reviews, field measurements, review of operational and maintenance practices, and other onsite assessments), information analysis, pump inventory, identification and evaluation of energy saving options.
  • Development of operational information on the pressure and discharge at major nodes of the water mains and distribution pipelines.
  • Assessment of the power supply system of the water intake facilities, pumping stations, and water treatment facilities to identify and recommend measures on how to improve the reliability of the system operation and maintain optimal pressure at control points.
  • Breakdown of energy consumption and costs based on a thorough assessment of the existing systems. This assessment is intended to inform the identification and prioritization of interventions (both physical and institutional) to improve energy efficiency and reduce costs of utility operations.

Based on the above, the Consultant shall establish an accurate and reliable method for measuring results of the implementation of the efficiency options.

Examples of energy efficiency (EE) measures shall include but not be limited to:

  • Pumps and pumping systems operations
    • Replace inefficient pumps
    • Install variable frequency drives
    • Operate pumping systems more efficiently
    • Improve maintenance of pumping systems
    • Install capacitors
  • Water loss management
    • Leak reduction
    • Pressure management[1]
  • Installing light emitting diodes (LEDs)
  • Wastewater treatment
    • Improve efficiency of anaerobic digestion

and aeration equipment

  • Use efficient activated sludge process (if appropriate)
  • Reduce wastewater with reuse and recycling
  • New technologies such as
    • Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA)
    • Smart pumps
    • Pumping systems optimization
    • Automated meter reading

For the identified options, the Consultant shall assess the implementation mechanisms, energy and cost savings, investment costs, operational and maintenance costs, and estimated payback periods. The Consultant shall also estimate the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions resulting from the implementation of the EE options.

Task 3: Analysis of Load Management Opportunties

This task shall include assessment of electricity usage profile for the water operations, specifically from the point of view of assessing the demand or load on the electrical system incurred during the peak-demand timings coincident with high electricity demand on the NAWEC electricity distribution system.

The consultant shall identify the peak electricity demand periods of NAWEC and estimate the benefits to the NAWEC Electricity system shifting pumping operations to off-peak periods. The Consultant shall identify options for load shifting to off-peak periods including increasing reservoir capacity, and other actions to facilitate the shifting of the water pumping timings. The consultant shall suggest demand management protocols to promote a permanent load shift through simple heuristics/rules for management of pumping hours, optimized use of holding capacities, etc.

In cooperation with NAWEC, The consultant shall also estimate the co-benefits to the NAWEC electric power system due to the reduction of the electricity peak loads, such as improved electrical systems efficiency, reduced power shortfalls and load curtailment/blackouts, reduced needs for new generation capacity and related investments, and reduced operational costs due to load shifting from peak to off-peak periods.

Task 4: Assessment of Potential for Renewable Energy

The consultant shall assess options for renewable energy generation in the water operations of NAWEC. These options shall include, but not be limited to:

  • Solar photovoltaic (PV) generation – Installation of solar collectors on rooftops at water supply and treatment facilities or other water-related properties, including floating solar PV plants on reservoirs, to produce electricity and reduce electricity needed from the NAWEC electrical system.
  • Solar PV applications for water pumping – Installation of solar pumps as replacements for existing electric pumps.
  • Generation of electricity from small hydropower – To the extent that NAWEC is discharging water to a lower level, small hydro turbines could be used to generate electricity.
  • Generation of biogas in wastewater treatment facilities for power generation or other uses.
  • Other renewable energy options, as applicable.

For each option, the consultant shall define the technical options, feasibility of implementation, electricity generation potential, cost savings, other benefits and co-benefits (including GHG reduction), and costs of construction, operation and maintenance.

 

Task 5: Investment Needs and Financing Options

The consultant shall develop and document the methodology and approach for conducting pre-feasibility analysis to translate key findings into investment needs, benefit-cost assessment, and implementation plans – considering both institutional and infrastructure/equipment requirements to improve efficiency of water operations, implement load management/demand response options, and utilize renewable energy where appropriate. The methodology shall include, as appropriate, development of energy and water balance models, and hydraulic modeling of the water supply system with different scenarios of water consumption and operation of pumping stations. It will also include identification of investment needs for key infrastructure and equipment for improved efficiency (e.g., leakage and pressure control, pump replacements, and other modifications) as well as renewable generation technologies. The Consultant shall prepare a pre-feasibility report for the measures identified in Tasks 1 – 3.

The consultant shall review and summarize international experience with respect to the options for implementation and financing the required investments. One option that should be explored is the engagement of energy service providers (ESPs), such as energy service companies (ESCOs), to undertake some or all of the implementation activities using a performance based contracting approach. An ESCO can provide services spanning the entire energy services value chain, including auditing, design and engineering, equipment procurement, installation and commissioning, financing, O&M, and facility management. The Consultant shall assess the existing market in The Gambia for provision of energy services and define whether and how NAWEC can work with local or international ESCOs to: (i) Mobilize private sector innovation, entrepreneurship, and financing; (ii) Obtain access to the latest energy efficient products, technologies, and equipment; (iii) achieve high-quality installation and O&M; (iv) obtain performance guarantees, thereby reducing the project risks.

The Consultant shall document typical business models used by ESCOs, such as guaranteed savings, shared savings, outsourced energy management, etc. The Consultant shall provide an overview of the current status of the energy services market in The Gambia and any expected activities by the Government of Gambia to facilitate and promote ESCOs.

Task 6 – Dissemination and Training

The Consultant shall conduct the study in close cooperation with NAWEC, and its conclusions will then be presented and discussed with NAWEC staff and management during a dissemination workshop. The main purposes of this workshop will be to (i) present the results; (ii) validate the information and assumptions; (iii) obtain additional feedback from a wider cross-section of NAWEC staff, including from its electricity operations; and (iv) raise awareness of the options and benefits; and (v) design and initiate a capacity building process to be taken up and intensified by the planned World Bank lending project.

The Consultant shall develop a training program that would include the following:

  • Training materials for water utility management and government officials on the benefits of energy management and energy efficiency improvement
  • Training of water utility engineers on options for energy efficiency and load management and related financing and implementation issues
  • Training of operating personnel on pumping technologies, energy auditing, and instrumentation and metering)Training of equipment and service providers who may be providing services to the water utility on detailed energy audits, assessment of the financial aspects of EE measures, implementation and commissioning, and measurement and verification (M&V)

Task 7 – recommendations for Scaling Up

The Consultant shall collaborate with NAWEC to develop a scaling up plan for extending the results of this study of the urban Banjul area to the other urban and rural areas of Gambia.

Reporting

The consultant shall provide the following reports:

  • Inception report
  • Energy Audit report
  • Load Management Report
  • Renewable Energy Options report
  • Pre-Feasibility report
  • Financing Options Report including assessment of potential for performance contracting using ESCOs or other financing mechanisms
  • Training materials
  • Draft Final Report
  • Final Report

SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Duration of Assignment

The estimated period of performance is eight (8) months. The contract is expected to commence on _______ and conclude on _______.

Payment Schedule

The Consultant is responsible for all project activities and logistics including, but not limited to, transport, lodging, supplies, translation/interpretation, telephones, computers, and so forth.

The assignment will be remunerated on a lump sum basis as per the norms and procedures of the World Bank. Payment will be linked to the following deliverables (specified in the Scope of Work), after being accepted by the World Bank to its satisfaction:

  • Contract Signing: 10% of contract value
  • Inception Report: 10% of contract value
  • Draft Reports on Energy Audit, Load Management and Renewable Energy – 30% of contract value
  • Pre-Feasibility Report – 10% of contract value
  • Financing Options Report – 10% of contract value
  • Draft Final Report – 15% of contract value
  • Final Report – 15% of contract value

 

Required Firm Qualifications and Experience

The Consultant must demonstrate experience in:

  • Conducting investment-grade energy audits for water supply, distribution and sanitation systems
  • Flow measurements for bulk water supply and distribution networks and creation of water and energy balance
  • Knowledge and understanding of water treatment facilities and related technology options
  • Understanding of electricity distribution systems
  • Experience in carrying out prefeasibility of engineering and costing with raw and/or treated water, assessment of renewable energy options.
  • Experience in the region is an advantage.

ANNEX A

INFORMATION ON THE NAWEC SYSTEM

 

The following files provide information on the NAWEC System:

 

(Note – we need to place the map and the four excel files on a web site that can be accessed by the respondents to the RFP.)

 

  • Map of the system
  • List of borehole pumps
  • List of stand-alone boreholes
  • Coordinates of all boreholes
  • List of tanks

 

[1]  Pressure management technologies such as Demand Driven Distribution (or equivalent) can considerably reduce surplus water pressure in pipes and lower the risk of water hammer, which is a primary cause of new holes. This multi-pump solution operates at proportional pressure and this ensures flow is supplied precisely as needed and at the pressure required.

Click on the link below for additional information.

REOI for Energy and Water Audit Final

Brikama Wellfield Boreholes
No.  Name Location Coordinates Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
Easting Northing
1 E1 Ballast 320534 1469928 85 19.32 SP46-5 7.5 OK
2 E14 Kassakunda 315430 1466380 75 15.4 SP95-7 30 OK
3 E15 Jambanjelly 314112 1467409 72 12.01 SP95-7 30 OK
4 E2 Nyambia Forest 319029 1469244 89 19.3 SP46-7 12 OK
5 N1 Abandoned 322959 1470679 17.93 OK
6 N2 Kabafita Forest N 321985 1470862 80 20.5 SP46-7 11 OK
7 N3 Kabafita Forest N 320726 1471119 75 20.82 SP77-5 18.5 OK
8 N4 Nyambia Forest N 319452 1471387 80 17.76 SP77-5 18.5 OK
9 N5 Nyambai Forest N 318332 1471618 78 17.4 SP77-5 18.5 OK
10 N6 Nyambai Forest N 317172 1471863 72 14.63 SP95-7 30 OK
11 O1 Ballast 320498 1469811 90 19.17 Observation B/Holes OK
12 O2 Kabafita Forest N 320517 1469890 100 18.74 OK
13 O3b Kabafita/Bafuloto Rd 318835 1471518 78 17.93 OK
14 E6 Kassakunda 317612 1465887 75 18.02 OK
15 E7 Kassakunda 316546 1464372 77 20.23 OK
16 E9 Nyofeleh Madina 315341 1463184 76 9.14 SP77-5 18.5 OK
17 E12 Siffoe 316437 1461645 73 9.51 SP77-7 18.5 OK
18 E13b Nyofeleh Madina 314835 1464757 89 16.81 SP77-7 26 OK
19 E5 Brikama Jamisa 318998 1466465 82 14.53 SP77-7 26 OK
20 E3 Brikama Jamisa 319449 1467933 90 19.19 SP77-7 26 OK
21 M3 Mandinari 323384 1476315 82 13.12 SP77-5 18.5 OK
22 M4b Mandinari 322860 1475696 85 16.81 SP46-7 11 OK
23 N1A Nyambai Forest S 317980 1469637 88 20.7 SP77-5 18.5 OK
24 MO3 Lamin 322701 1477844 Observation BHs OK
25 O5 Nyofeleh Madina 315361 1463096 OK
Brikama Stand Alone Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 Brik old Tank Nema 13°16’32.29″N 16°38’50.84″W N/A N/A SP-30-8 7.5 OK
2 Brik  new Tank Kabafita 13°17’12.88″N  16°38’24.39″W 90.2 20.6 SP-77-5 30 OK
3 Kembujeh Kembujeh 13°16’49.48″N 16°37’52.23″W N/A N/A N/A N/A OK
Yundum Wellfield Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 YUN/T Yundum Tank  13°22’8.46″N  16°39’12.79″W 64.9 21.4 SP77.5 18.5 OK
2 TTC Yundum Army Barracks  13°21’47.67″N 16°39’41.86″W N/A 22.22 SP46-8 13 OK
3 NASA Yundum Airport  13°20’54.44″N  16°38’57.92″W N/A 26.22 SP77-5 18.5 OK
JOB 2 Yundum Airport N/A N/A N/A N/A OK
Fajara Wellfield Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 1A Kairaba Ave  13°27’51.85″N  16°41’20.87″W N/A N/A SP-46-7 11 Ok
2 1B Kairaba Ave  13°27’31.27″N  16°41’6.77″W N/A N/A SP-46-8 15 Ok
3 BH5 Latrikunda  13°27’14.82″N  16°40’57.92″W N/A N/A SP-46-8 13 Ok
4 BH6 Fajara  13°27’53.48″N  16°40’53.33″W N/A N/A SP-77-5 18.5 Ok
5 BH14 Kanifing  13°27’32.50″N  16°40’43.47″W N/A N/A SP46-8 15 Ok
6 BH16 Stadium  13°28’8.99″N  16°40’46.35″W N/A N/A SP-77-5 15 Ok
Serrekunda Wellfield Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Power (kw) BH Status
1 BH8 Serekunda tank  13°26’10.92″N  16°40’56.31″W 60.95 11.62 SP-30-8 7.5 Ok
2 BH10 Bakoteh  13°25’42.33″N 16°41’45.44″W N/A N/A SP-30-8 7.5 Ok
3 BH11 Sukuta  13°24’50.33″N  16°41’35.42″W N/A N/A SP 46 8 15 Ok
4 BH12 Nema Kunku  13°24’50.72″N  16°40’57.83″W N/A N/A SP-30-8 7.5 Ok
5 BH17 Nema Kunku  13°24’18.11″N  16°41’20.31″W N/A N/A SP-95-5 22 Ok
6 BH18 Willingara  13°24’18.81″N 16°40’25.37″W N/A N/A SP-46-12 15 Ok
7 PN-2 Willingara  13°23’23.33″N  16°41’7.70″W N/A N/A SP-77.5 18.5 Ok
8 PN-3 Willingara  13°23’22.47″N 16°40’25.92″W N/A N/A SP 77.-5 18.5 Ok
9 PN-4 Willingara  13°23’37.05″N  16°40’1.60″W N/A N/A SP-77-5 18.5 Ok
10 PN-5 Willingara 13°23’49.69″N  16°40’25.25″W N/A N/A SP-45-15 15 Ok
11 PN-6 Willingara  13°23’30.75″N  16°40’43.75″W N/A N/A SP77-5 18.5 Ok
GBA Stand Alone Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Power (kw) BH Status
1 Kan/Tank Kanifing  13°27’44.61″N  16°40’41.22″W N/A N/A SP77-5 18.5 OK
2 Kerr Serign Kerr Serign  13°26’8.76″N  16°42’52.38″W N/A N/A SP-30-6 5.5 OK
Sukuta Wellfiled Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Power (kw) BH Status
1 SS-1 Salagie  13°23’43.34″N  16°42’13.12″W 58 18.28 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
2 SS-2 Salagie  13°22’57.41″N  16°42’15.29″W 65 19.68 SP230-10 15 OK
3 SS-3 Salagie  13°22’2.25″N  16°42’12.18″W 76 21.46 SP 95-5 22 OK
4 SS-4 Salagie  13°21’40.29″N  16°42’18.83″W 60 18.61 SP-45-15 18.5 OK
5 SS-5 Salagie  13°23’31.35″N  16°43’11.43″W 60 16.24 SP-46-8 15 OK
6 SS-6 Jabang  13°21’40.29″N  16°42’18.83″W N/A N/A SP-77-5 18.5 OK
OB8 67 13.49 Observation BHs OK
JO1 68 12.81 OK
JO2 71 13.53 OK
JO2A 32 13.78 OK
JO3 80 12.55 OK
7 A-1 Jambur  13°21’47.45″N  16°43’32.59″W 69 13.83 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
8 A-2 Jambur  13°21’1.42″N  16°42’28.59″W 63 5.79 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
9 A-3 Jambur  13°20’37.33″N  16°43’12.13″W 62 7.94 SP-77-5 30 OK
10 A-4 Jambur  13°19’53.04″N  16°42’26.89″W 71 13.74 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
11 A-5 Jambur  13°20’28.22″N  16°41’49.35″W 65 10.95 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
12 B-1 Jambur  13°19’9.01″N  16°43’7.63″W 78 8.12 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
13 B-2 Jambur  13°18’37.39″N  16°41’59.36″W 80 17.03 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
14 B-3 Jambur  13°18’8.96″N  16°43’9.70″W 73 12.51 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
15 B-4 Jambur  13°19’21.80″N  16°42’26.70″W 93 18.64 SP-77-5 18.5 OK
16 SS-7 STP Sukuta  13°23’31.00″N  16°42’17.00″W N/A N/A SP-77-6 18.5 OK
17 JOB 1 Salagi Forest  13°22’31.00″N  16°42’20.00″W N/A N/A SP-77-7 18.5 OK
Gunjur Wellfield Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 G-1 GUNJUR  13°11’27.00″N  16°45’03.00″W N/A N/A KSB 18.5 OK
2 G-2 SANDALI  13°12’20.00″N  16°43’53.00″W N/A N/A KSB 18.5 No
Kotu Ring Project Boreholes-Sukuta Wellfiled
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 C1 LATRIA  13°21’14.68″N  16°41’32.27″W N/A N/A SP77-5 18.5 OK
2 C2 JABANG  13°20’9.17″N  16°41’22.84″W N/A N/A SP77-7 26 OK
3 C3 JAMBUR  13°19’0.22″N  16°41’52.60″W N/A N/A SP95-5 22 OK
4 C4 BRIKAMA  13°17’50.93″N  16°41’25.86″W N/A N/A SP95-5 26 No
5 C5 JALAMBANG  13°16’42.95″N  16°41’5.80″W N/A N/A SP95-5 26 OK
New Stand Alone Boreholes
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 A BRUFUT WARD TANK BOREHOLE  13°23’46.39″N  16°45’11.81″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
2 B BRUFUT  TANK BOREHOLE  13°22’43.48″N  16°45’40.66″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
3 D BRUSIBI TANK BOREHOLE  13°24’34.42″N  16°43’21.95″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
4 E OLD YUNDUM TANK BOREHOLE  13°22’11.48″N  16°40’57.32″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
5 F TANJI BOREHOLE  13°20’48.20″N  16°47’15.43″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
6 G SANYANG BOREHOLE  13°16’10.34″N  16°45’33.24″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
7 I JAMBANJELLY BOREHOLE  13°17’9.10″N  16°43’31.55″W N/A N/A N/A 7.5 OK
Proposed Boreholes World Bank- GBA
No Borehole Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type ≈ Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 WB-1 Nyambai Forest  13°17’26.67″N  16°39’25.09″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
2 WB-2 Kabafita Forest  13°17’51.30″N  16°39’40.28″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
3 WB-3 Kabafita Forest  13°17’47.93″N  16°39’11.68″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
4 WB-4 Kabafita Forest  13°17’31.53″N  16°38’45.32″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
5 WB-5 Kabafita Forest  13°17’35.93″N  16°38’13.73″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
6 WB-6 Kabafita Forest  13°25’29.71″N  16°42’35.57″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
7 WB-7 Nema Su  13°24’32.06″N  16°41’42.54″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
8 WB-8 Nyofelleh  13°22’12.10″N  16°40’57.64″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled
9 WB-9 kanuma N/A N/A TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled Out of scope for energy audit
10 WB-10 Farafenni N/A N/A TBC TBC TBC 18.5 To be drilled Out of scope for energy audit
Indian Project Boreholes-Sukuta Wellfiled
No Name Location Latitude longitude Total/Depth Drilled SWL Pump type ≈ Rated Power (kw) BH Status
1 SP/GBA-1 Mamuda Village  13°18’04.00″N  16°43’46.00″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
2 SP/GBA-2 Mamuda Village  13°18’06.64″N  16°44’21.98″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
3 SP/GBA-3 Mamuda Village  13°18’31.18″N  16°44’20.81″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
4 SP/GBA-4 Mamuda Village  13°19’04.42″N  16°44’17.42″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
5 SP/GBA-5 Banyaka Village  13°19’46.21″N  16°44’10.83″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
6 SP/GBA-6 Latriya village  13°20’20.20″N  16°43’58.18″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
7 SP/GBA-7 Jambur Village  13°19’34.17″N  16°43’47.62″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
8 SP/GBA-8 Jambur Village  13°19’45.80″N  16°43’06.94″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
9 SP/GBA-9 Jambur Tank Site  13°19’17.29″N  16°42’04.32″W TBC TBC TBC 18.5 Under construction
* BH Borehole
** TBC To be confirmed
Item No. Water Treatment Plant No. of Boreholes Capacity m3/hr. Boreholes in Operation Actual Capacity m3/hr. Pump details Motor details Status of pump/motor
Type Pump No. Serial no: Head Dischargem3/h Type Serial no: Power( KW) RPM
1 Fajara Water Treatment Plant 6 316.8 6 316.8 KSB P1 9974056414/400/01 20 144 ABB 3G1J19250001731261 15 1463 Ok
KSB P2 9974056414/400/02 20 144 ABB 3G1J19250001731262 15 1463 Ok
KSB P3 9974056414/400/03 20 144 ABB 3G1J19250001731263 15 1463 Ok
2 Serekunda Water Treatment Plant 12 792 11 720 GRUNDFOS P1 A97508487P109300001 45 288 GRUNDFOS 10710173417 – 2 55 1470 Ok
GRUNDFOS P2 A97508487P109300002 45 288 GRUNDFOS 10710173417 – 5 55 1470 Ok
GRUNDFOS P3 A97508611P109300003 45 288 GRUNDFOS 10710173417 – 3 55 1470 Ok
GRUNDFOS SP4 96595583P209210004 81.1 148 MMG160M – 42 – E2 80158 11 1460 Ok
GRUNDFOS SP5 96595583P209210005 81.1 148 MMG160M – 42 – E2 80161 11 1460 Ok
3 Sukuta Water Treatment Plant 20 1425.6 18 1295.6 KSB P1 9974056414/200/05 60 288 ABB 3G1J19310001745391 75 1488 Ok
KSB P2 9974056414/200/01 60 288 ABB 3G2J19260090090674 75 1488 Ok
KSB P3 9974056414/100/04 60 288 ABB 3G2J19260090090672 75 1488 Ok
KSB P4 9974056414/100/02 60 288 ABB 3G2J19260090090671 75 1488 Ok
KSB P5 9974056414/100/03 60 288 ABB 3G1J19310001745389 75 1488 Ok
KSB P6 9974056414/100/03 60 288 ABB 3G1J19310001745390 75 1488 Ok
KSB P7 9974056414/200/01 60 288 ABB 3G1J19310001745388 75 1488 Ok
KSB P8 9974056414/200/05 60 288 ABB 3G2J19260090090673 75 1488 Ok
KSB P9 386639 50 288 KSB 12SET20181045414325 55 1480 Ok
KSB P10 386637 50 288 KSB 12SET20181045414325 55 1480 Ok
KSB P11 386638 50 288 KSB 17SET20181045476184 55 1480 Ok
KSB P12 66356 50 216 KSB UC1107/088803908 55 1480 No
KSB P13 9974056414/300/02 35 180 ABB 3G1J19250001730813 30 1474 Ok
KSB P14 9974056414/300/01 35 180 ABB 3G1J19250001730812 30 1471 Ok
4 Brikama Ballast Water Treatment Plant 17 1278 16 1198.6 KSB P1-1 246598 32.5 55.5 SIEMENS E0903/518820701003 15 1465 Ok
KSB P1-2 246599 32.5 55.5 SIEMENS E0903/518820701001 15 1465 Ok
KSB P1-3 246600 32.5 55.5 SIEMENS E0903/518820701002 15 1465 Ok
KSB P2-1 247834 93 257 SIEMENS 0909/059470401 105 2984 Ok
KSB P2-2 247832 93 257 SIEMENS 0909/059470403 105 2984 Ok
KSB P2-3 247833 93 257 SIEMENS 0909/059470404 105 2984 Ok
KSB P2-4 247831 93 257 SIEMENS 0909/059470402 105 2984 Ok
5 Gunjur Water Treatment Plant 2 72 2 72 KSB 1 ETN080-065 24 100 SIEMENS N/A 11 2960 Ok
KSB 2 ETN080-065 24 100 SIEMENS N/A 11 2960 Ok
Sub – Total 57 3884.4 53 3603
Standalone Systems
1 Mandinary 2 162 2 162 Direct Injection of water to the distribution system Ok
2 Yundum 3 165.6 3 165.6 Ok
3 Kerr Serign 1 36 1 36 Ok
4 Kanifing Tank 1 68.4 1 68.4 Ok
5 Kembujaye 1 36 0 0 Ok
6 Brikama Kabafita 1 79 1 79 Ok
7 Brikama Old Tank 1 29 0 0 Ok
8 Brufut 1 36 0 0 Ok
9 Bwiam 1 36 1 36 Ok
Sub – Total 12 648 9 547 Ok
Stand Alone Pumping Stations
Item No. Pumping Station Capacity m3/h Actual Capacity m3/h Pump details Motor details Pump and Motor Status
Type Pump No. Serial no: Head (m)  Discharge m3/h Type Serial no: Power( KW) RPM
1 Mile II Station N/A N/A KSB P1-1 N/A 40 216 VEM        MOTOR N/A 37 2900 Ok
KSB P1-2 N/A 40 216 VEM        MOTOR N/A 37 2900 Ok
KSB P1-3 N/A 40 216 VEM        MOTOR N/A 37 2900 Ok
Item No. Pumping Station Capacity m3/h N/A Type Pump No. Serial no: Head(m) Expected Discharge m3/h Type Serial no: Power( KW) RPM Pump and Motor Status
2 Jambur Station N/A N/A KSB P-1 N/A N/A 90 KSB N/A 22 N/A Under contruction
KSB P-2 N/A N/A 90 KSB N/A 22 N/A Under construction
* N/A Information not available, either project is under construction or client could not retrieve from old files at the time
No. Elevated Tanks Height to tank floor( m) Depth of tank(m) Capacity (M3) Coordinates
Latitude Longitude
1 Banjul West 17 3.6                         500  13°27’11″N  16°34’33″W
2 Brikama New 14 5.12                         500  13°22’08″N  16°38’24″W
3 Faji Kunda 15 5.12                         500  13°24’44″N  16°40’17″W
4 Kanifing 14.2 8.48                     1,500  13°27’44″N  16°40’40″W
5 Kotu 16 5.63                     1,000  13°26’27″N  16°42’12″W
6 Latrikunda 13.7 3.9                         500  13°27’15″N  16°40’55″W
7 Mile II 15 5.12                         500  13°27’54″N  16°36’09″W
8 Serekunda New 16 5.63                     1,000  13°26’12″N  16°40’56″W
9 Serekunda Old TBC TBC                         477  13°26’11″N  16°40’27″W
10 Sukuta 17.27 5.12                         500  13°24’29″N  16°42’27″W
11 Yundum 16 5.63                     1,000  13°22’11″N  16°40’57″W
12 Fajara TBC TBC                     1,500  13°28’22″N  16°41’41″W
13 Albion N°.2 TBC TBC                     1,206  13°27’10″N  16°34’58″W
14 Brikama Old TBC TBC                         477  13°16’31″N  16°38’50″W
15 Mandinarine TBC TBC                         500  13°22’05″N  16°36’35″W
16 Banjulinding TBC TBC                         500  13°22’08″N  16°39’12″W
17 Farato TBC TBC                         500
18 Brusubi TBC TBC                         500  13°24’34″N  16°43’21″W
17 Bijilo TBC TBC                     1,000  13°25’34″N  16°43’45″W
18 Brufut village TBC TBC                           60  13°22’43.48″N  16°45’40.66″W
19 Brufut Height TBC TBC                         500  13°23’46.39″N  16°45’11.81″W
21 Tujereng TBC TBC                           80  13°22’43.48″N  16°45’40.66″W
22 Sanyang TBC TBC                           60  13°16’10.34″N  16°45’33.24″W
23 Tanji TBC TBC                           60  13°20’48.20″N  16°47’15.43″W
24 Kembujeh TBC TBC                         500  13°16’49″N  16°37’52″W
25 Gunjur Tank TBC TBC                         500  13°11’25″N  16°45’04″W
Sub total                   15,920
No. Low Tanks/Reservoirs Height to tank floor( m) Depth of tank(m) Capacity (M3) Coordinates
Latitude Longitude
2 Fajara low level TBC TBC 1000  13°28’22″N  16°41’42″W
3 Jambur TBC TBC 500  13°19’14″N  16°42’04″W
4 Gunjur TBC TBC 200  13°11’25″N  16°45’03″W
6 Brikama  LLT x 2 TBC TBC 1200  13°17’25″N  16°39’23″W
7 Mile II -2 TBC TBC 1500  13°27’55″N  16°36’12″W
8 Mile II -1 TBC TBC 1500  13°27’55″N  16°36’11″W
9 Sukuta 1 TBC TBC 1200  13°23’32″N  16°42’13″W
10 Sukuta  3- Ward TBC TBC 500  13°23’31″N  16°42’16″W
11 SerreKunda TBC TBC TBC  13°26’11″N  16°40’54″W
12 Sukuta  3 TBC TBC 1000  13°23’31″N  16°42’16″W
Sub total 8600
* N/A Information not avalable
TBC To be confirmed