GAMBIA ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT (GERMP) TERMS OF REFERENCE for Developing a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) Implementation in The Gambia Transmission and Distribution Electricity Network Modernization GREATER BANJUL AREA

GAMBIA ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT (GERMP)

TERMS OF REFERENCE

for Developing a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) Implementation

 in The Gambia Transmission and Distribution Electricity Network Modernization

GREATER BANJUL AREA 

 

Information can be obtained by clicking on the link below

REOI RAP IMPLEMENTATION SUPPORT- for T Line

I. BACKGROUND OF THE PROJECT

The Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) was based on the outcome of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) report of the proposed high voltage (HV) transmission and distribution (T&D) infrastructure (lines, substation and other ancillary facilities) along the Jabang-Brikama corridor in the Greater Banjul Area (GBA) of The Gambia. The different sub-components of the Transmission and Distribution network in the Greater Banjul Area are:

  1. 225 kV transmission line in the GBA will be used for transmission purpose, while the 33 kV will remain used for distribution/transmission purpose.
  2. Creation of a new 225/33 kV substation (S/S) in Jabang and 33kV in Kotu Tank to develop the meshing of the 33 kV grid nearby Kotu. There are also new 33 kV overhead lines to build from the future 225/33 kV Jabang substation.
  3. Create a National Control Center (NCC) at Brikama and improve communication control. From the NCC, it shall be possible to operate remotely and automatically power plants, 225/33 kV substations and 33/11 kV substations.

The Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure in the Greater Banjul Area is one component of the Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP), with the specific aim of generating reliable and renewable energy. GERMP is a $164 million multi-donor funded project involving the World Bank (WB), European Union (EU) and the European Investment Bank (EIB). Specifically, the development of the Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure is funded by the World Bank.

 

Currently, the proposed location of the project consists mainly of bushes and shrubs, but also some inhabited areas along the lines from Brikama to Jabang, then from Jabang to Brusubi, Wellingara, Old Yundum and Kotu Tank. Given the above, therefore, the ESIA report recommended the development of a RAP since the project’s social risks identified include restricted access to natural resources, loss of land, assets, and livelihoods and can potentially have a negative impact on community social cohesion.

II. THE DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE AND PROJECT COMPONENTS

The development objective of the project is to improve the operational performance of NAWEC, and its capacity to dispatch water and variable renewable electricity. The GERMP will improve the power generation capacity and efficiency of NAWEC’s transmission network to increase access to electricity for socio-economic development. This objective is in line with the National Development Plan (NDP-2018-2021), the Gambia Electricity Sector Roadmap (2017) and the National Energy Policy (2014-2018), among other national policies which promote the extension, reliability, and quality of the Government’s energy supply nationally, as well as diversifying energy sources to include renewables.

The GERMP consists of the following three electricity components:

  1. On-grid solar PV with storage: This component comprises the development of a 20MW solar PV Plant in Jambur village. The component will include battery back up to minimize grid absorption concerns.

 

  1. Transmission and distribution (T&D) restoration and modernization: This component will include upgrades of the T&D to (i) absorb the additional generation capacity; (ii) prepare for future capacity expansion including Laminkoto to Diabugu network, OMVG and other pipeline projects; (iii) reduce T&D losses; and (iv) make future grid extensions possible. This component also includes activities such as emergency communications campaigns, LED bulbs to replace incandescent bulbs in government offices and replacement of streetlights as part of demand-side management initiative, and urgent equipment rehabilitation.

 

  1. Urgent institutional support for sector turnaround: This component will involve institutional strengthening, capacity building and project implementation support related to the improved operational performance of NAWEC. Institutional strengthening includes 1) twinning with the University of The Gambia for cross-learning; 2) study tour to review environmental and social management systems in other power utilities, and 3) the participation of NAWEC social and environmental specialists in a short-term course on environmental and social management.

 

III. PROFILE OF PROJECT AREA

 

a) Project Location and Size

 

The project crosses the regions of Greater Banjul Area (GBA) and West Coast and the following villages:

  • Settlements crossed by new 225 kV HV lines: Jabang, Jamwelly, Mariama Kunda, Latriya, Jambur, Farato, Forato Bodian Kunda and Kabafita (Kabilo included in Brikama);
  • Settlements crossed by new 33kV MV lines: Kotu, Bijilo, Brusubi, Salagi, Jabang, Old Yundum and Wellingara.

b) Description of Site and Land use

Transmission line (TL)

The 18km long line will connect the new OMVG substation which is being built at Brikama and the new Jabang substation that is part of the Project. The land use of this area is a mixte of forested areas, settlements, empty lands, fenced plots of land, gardens and farmlands.

  • A right of way (RoW) has been defined. The width of the corridor under the line has been established at 40 m for the single circuit 225 kV line. This value is generally compatible with West African standard practice. Electrical clearances to comply with have been specified.
  • Each pylon will induce clearing at a circle surface of 15 m of diameter.

The 225/33 kV Jabang substation

The 300 x 300 m site is located in Jabang at the south-eastern corner of the Salagi forest. It is adjacent to the Sukuta-Jambanjelly highway and access will be possible from the south-eastern corner of the Salagi Forest. Some roads and a car park may be constructed within the site to ease circulation and parking of vehicles.

The distribution lines (DL)

Four new 33 kV double circuit overhead lines will be built as follows:

  • Line 1A from Jabang substation towards Bijilo Substation: approximatively 7.5 km
  • Line 1B from Jabang substation to Old Yundum police where it connects to the existing line Wellingara – Medina: approximatively 2.4 km
  • Line 1C from Jabang substation towards Wellingara substation. It ends at NEMA high school where it connects to the existing line Wellingara–Kotu: approximately 5.2 km
  • Line 2B from Palma Rima Junction to the new Kotu Tank substation: approximately 1.9 km. This line shall be connected to the existing line Bijilo – Kotu Power Station.

 

No specific Row is defined. The conditions to comply with are the following ones along the lines:

  • No buildings present at less than 3 meters vertically and 3.25 meters horizontally from the conductors. These distances represent the clearance to houses. No building shall be dismantled: the routing of each line shall be defined to avoid them while keeping the safety clearances.
  • No trees which could damage the conductors or may induce safety risks to neighbouring populations: some trees may have to be felled.
  • The line will be installed in the road easement (servitude) or within Forest Parks.

The 33/11kV Kotu Tank substation

This new substation will be located a few kilometres away from the Kotu Power Plant (i.e Kotu Dispatching) within an existing NAWEC property. A 15×15 m surface will be necessary for the two outdoors 33/11 kV power transformers and a technical building.

The National Control Center (NCC)

Next to the land considered for the OMVG project for the Brikama sub-station, a 50×50 m building will be built by NAWEC to accommodate the National Control Center. The property belongs to NAWEC and is located in an industrial area.

The NCC will include a complete control system including basic SCADA[1] software, hardware components and peripheral equipment, a national load dispatch centre building and communication systems.

 

 IV. CATEGORIES AND TYPES OF IMPACTS AND PERSONS AFFECTED

 a) Types of Project Impacts

 

The types of impacts resulting from the project cover direct economic and social impacts as well as social-environmental impacts resulting in:

iPermanent loss of land

The land affected, whether cultivable or not, shall be replaced with land of the same type or compensated in cash at the market price.

i.i Affected land concerns:

  • Towers: A circular area of 15 meters diameter will be lost for owners at each tower of the transmission line (1,17ha), except for towers present within the Salagi Forest (4 towers, or 706 m²). For the land belonging to the Department of Forestry, no compensation is considered for the loss of the land.
  • Affected area: The area lost represents a small percentage of the area of the parcel being farmed, e.g., about 7% for an average parcel of land.
  • New access roads: They will induce loss of land to compensate owners. No area is considered for enlargement of existing roads as enlargements will be completed within their easements (managed by the National Road Authority).
  • Structures to be resettled: The loss of structures which will be resettled outside the ROW will induce loss of land as well. The average surface of a dwelling is of 155 m² for an average parcel area of 1500 m², thus representing around 10% of the parcel.

ii. Restriction on land use at the ROW of the transmission line

After construction, the land will remain accessible to previous land users. However, some restrictions of use will have to be considered on the ROW:

  • Construction of any new structure will not be authorized
  • Crop trees or timber trees higher than 5 meters will not be authorized
  • NAWEC will have permanent access to each tower and to the full ROW for maintenance purposes (line, towers, and ROW maintenance).

 Permitted authorizations: Grazing and low crops will be authorized. The maximum height not to exceed for crops has been established at 5 m.

SCADA: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

iii. Loss of crops

Any destruction of fruit and productive trees and any damage caused to annual crops shall give the right to compensation.

 

A. Annual crops

For annual crops, the compensation shall consider:

  • The market purchase price from the producer [2]
  • A compensation factor considering soil preparation work, the cost of the seeds and the maintenance of the culture.
  • The surfaces cultivated, and
  • The average yield of each crop.

The area destructed will be limited to an 8-m wide corridor centered on the transmission line.

These losses are temporary. Compensation will be calculated considering one crop year of the most expensive crop cultivated on the plot. If the temporary situation were to extend beyond one year, a new compensation on the same nature would be allocated.

BPerennial crops of private owners or communities

B.1 Trees below 5 meters

  • Transmission line: Trees below 5 meters will be felled down within the 8-m wide corridor to allow the construction works. It will be authorized to plant similar species on this 8-m wide strip after construction.
  • No trees were identified during the PAP survey as being below 5 meters when mature.

B.2 Trees above 5 meters

B. 2.i Transmission line:

  • Timber trees and fruit trees which can mature above 5m will be cleared on a 40m ROW. The PAP survey identified the following trees for fruit and timber trees:
    • Fruit trees: Cashew trees, mango trees, banana trees, citrus, and orange trees,
    • Timber trees: Gmelina, eucalyptus, rosewood, rhun palm tree, bamboos, forest trees and palm trees (Salagi forest included).
  • Trees higher than 20m present outside the 40m right and which may jeopardize the conductors’ integrity will be felled too.
  • The Department of Forestry and NAWEC will conduct a preliminary survey along the line to determine which trees will have to be felled depending on their location, their height, and their biodiversity value[3]. This concerns mostly the Salagi forest and the few wooded areas present along the line.
[1]Women frequently suffer disproportionately in resettlement, as they are often a disproportionately large number of the poor; have more limited access to resources, opportunities, and public services than men; and as a result, rely more heavily on informal support networks within their existing communities. The resettlement planning process needs to consider the situation of women and to adapt the engagement process as necessary to ensure that women have a role in decision making. A comprehensive planning process includes identification of: (a) women’s means of income generation and livelihoods, including non-formal activities such as gathering natural resources, or trading and bartering services and wares; (b) women’s social and economic networks, including extended family ties; and (c) women’s ownership of affected assets, including land and crops, in order to appropriately compensate them.

iv. Loss of collective structures

No boring or well will be dismantled. That includes the NAWEC borings along the Kabafita and Nyambai forests, the collective wells, and all other hydraulic structures.

No collective structure has been identified on the ROW of the transmission line.

v. Restriction of use of supply ecosystem services

The Salagi forest will be affected by the transmission line, the Jabang substation and the distribution line 1A. It belongs to the Department of Forest and a specific compensation has been provided in the ESIA for reforestation.

A wooded area which belongs to a community has been identified at Latriya. The costs for loss of these trees have been considered.

vi. Restoration of income and means of subsistence

People affected by the project may lose their source of income for a period. Even if the infrastructure or new house is completed before the move, a transition period is necessary to adapt to the new environment and reconstitute a livelihood.

Therefore, PAPs must benefit from special resettlement/transition measures to be defined as part of the resettlement plans once the results of the social-economic studies on household sources of income have been considered. The resettlement plan provides transitional support to those whose livelihoods will be disrupted. This may include payment for lost crops and lost natural resources, payment of lost profits for businesses, or payment of lost wages for employees affected by business relocation. The plan provides that the transitional support continues for the duration of the transition period.

Transmission line: Several commercial activities have been declared in the PAP survey:

  • A wood factory (Kabafita), holding a workshop for crafting in the ROW
  • The cement factory which is in a warehouse (in Kabafita)
  • A quarry (in Forato Bodian Kunda) where no infrastructure will be affected by the project
  • A bare land with a sign “AMRC Property” (in Kabafita),
  • NAWEC (Forato Bodian Kunda) holding a small building in the ROW,
  • Ancha shop (a company selling food and clothes, inJabang). This activity is managed by the wife of the head of household
  • A hucker stand (in Latriya)

The infrastructures present for the wood factory, the Cement factory, the NAWEC site and the Ancha shop will be compensated for physical resettlement.

Additional specific resettlement measures are necessary to help to restore the business activities when they are affected, and those measures are included in the RAP.

vii. Distribution lines: Only the business activities located at the towers will be impacted for one month as the location of each pole can be adjusted to avoid the business activities which are fixed. Among the 68 commercial activities registered along the line 2B, 53 can be easily moved as they are using tables, stalls, zinc canteens (luggage and horse taxis).

A maximum of 32 commercial activities may be disturbed at the locations of the towers for 1 month.

 

V. THE PROJECT AFFECTED PERSONS (PAPS)

There are two types of PAPs identified:

i) Individual PAPs

The individual PAPs are all those persons who own or are using plots of land in the corridor.

  • 493 individual PAPs were enumerated. A total of 400 of the 493 potential PAPs could not be traced or identified to be enumerated despite many sensitization and outreach campaigns. The Project is working on the corridor pegging to ease identification of the rest of potential PAPs.
  • Some plots had structures on them, but names are not ascribed to them. Nonetheless, the structures were valued and entered appropriately in the Entitlement Matrix with no names attached to them. Equally, there were plots without structures (i.e. empty land). Where there was insufficient information to confirm ownership when possible, land and asset values were estimated and entered appropriately against the names.

Should the owners of such plots claim their benefits future, and the names can be matched with the properties, they will be compensated as indicated upon producing appropriate proof and documentation of ownership.

ii) Institutional PAP

The only institution affected by the project is the Department of Forestry (DOF) which would lose all the forest trees and other vegetation covers on Salagi, Nyambai and Kabafita forest parks. These trees include the rhum and oil palms, in addition to the various other species of shrubs and vegetation covering the field.

 

Regarding compensation to the Department of Forestry, a Memorandum of Understanding has been signed between NAWEC and DOF. For the compensation of affected trees, before cutting or trimming trees, NAWEC safeguards team and DOF staff will complete an inventory of the affected area, and a reforestation plan will be submitted with the budget for approval before its implementation.

NAWEC safeguards team will monitor the implementation of the reforestation plan.

VI. OBJECTIVES AND RATIONALE OF THE RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN

Since this project is funded by the World Bank, and project implementation will result in both physical and economic displacement, it is a requirement that a RAP is developed according to the World Bank Involuntary Resettlement Policy (OP 4.12). This is because when involuntary resettlement takes place, people lose their land, assets and access to assets, their income, and livelihoods, with or without physical relocation. The effect of these losses on the persons living in the project zone would increase poverty unless measures are put in place to compensate them for the losses incurred so that the living conditions of pre-project PAPs are at minimum restored or better, be improved, especially those who are vulnerable to they do not suffer disproportionate adverse impacts.

 

The objective of the RAP, therefore, is to provide guidelines that will ensure that since land acquisition for the project activities is inevitable, resettlement and compensation processes for the lost land and associated assets must be executed in line with the RAP, which will:

i. Reduce the risks of deepening poverty, exclusion, inequitable access to benefits especially for vulnerable and marginalized individuals and groups such as women, women head of households, elderly, children, persons with disabilities, etc.

ii. Mitigate adverse impacts including those relating to loss of livelihood from the reduced opportunity of collecting plant resources, and this will consequently prevent competition and conflict

iii. Minimize, as much as possible, involuntary physical and economic displacement

iv. Ensure that the affected populations that must leave their living environment and/or lose part of their property or assets following the completion of the project are:

  • Compensated for these losses at full replacement cost, including the option of land for land compensation should also be considered.
  • That affected livelihoods are restored or improved

 

VII. TASKS

1) Implementation of mitigation measures, land acquisition and livelihood restoration: The consultant shall be responsible for the implementation of the RAP that includes mitigating the adverse effects of the project, while also aiming to improve their standards of living or at least restore them in real terms to pre-displacement levels or to levels prevailing prior to the beginning of project implementation, whichever is higher. The consultant shall facilitate the land acquisition process on behalf of NAWEC Project Implementation Unit (PIU) as per the Resettlement Action Plan. In addition, the consultant shall remain responsible for the development of a comprehensive livelihood restoration plan to facilitate the PAPs to take advantages of the options available as per the RAP to improve their livelihoods or at least restore them in real terms to pre-displacement levels.

2) Dissemination of Information and Consultation: The consultant will be responsible for accurate, inclusive, and timely dissemination of information to the PAPs on the resettlement policy, provisions, and approach to land acquisition as per the RAP, time frame for implementation, roles, and responsibilities of implementing agency, and the Grievance Mechanism, and keep accurate records of consultations and communications with PAPs. The consultant must ensure that appropriate information related to resettlement is disclosed to PAPs in a timely, understandable, accessible, and appropriate manner and format.  Measures to reach out to PAPs who may be vulnerable, such as women, elderly, persons with disabilities and others are important to ensure inclusive decision-making and inclusive access to benefits.

The consultant shall sensitize PAPs on their rights, entitlements, and obligations under the RAP. Information to the PAPs shall be disseminated on the possible impacts of the project on the communities’ livelihood systems, property and physical assets, and the options available, so they can make informed decisions. The consultant shall explain to the PAPs why land acquisition was necessary, the provisions of the policy and the entitlements under the RAP, and the consultant will keep accurate records detailing communications and concerns between the consultant and the PAP.  The consultant will provide regular and timely communications to the PIU on the outcomes of such discussions, especially concerns raised by the PAPs.

3) Land Acquisition: The consultant will facilitate the land acquisition process up to receipt of compensation payment and/or physical displacement resettlement assistance in consultation with NAWEC PIU and the PAPs.

The consultant will support PAPs to complete the required documents to access compensation cheques. The consultant will facilitate the disbursement of compensation cheques. In addition, the consultant will ensure compensatory benefits to women; specifically, ensuring that the financial benefits are distributed equitably among the men and women, as per the RAP.

 

4) Verification: The consultant shall undertake joint verification with the PIU safeguards team to identify eligible PAPs as per the cut-off date for resettlement entitlement and shall update the database accordingly. The consultant shall verify the information already contained in the RAP and the individual losses of households and validate the same and suggest suitable changes if required, in a dynamic map marking the plot of land associated with each PAP.

During the identification and verification of the eligible PAPs, the consultant shall ensure that each of them is contacted and consulted. A woman facilitator shall conduct a consultation with the women including women-headed households.

Verification exercise shall include actual measurement of the extent of total property loss/damage and valuation of the same. Prepare and put-up updated database on individual losses required for preparation of micro-plans to be submitted to NAWEC PIU. After getting approval of the same from NAWEC – PIU, the consultant shall display the list of eligible PAPs in the affected communities for PAP’s to verify.

The consultant will identify and verify the community assets and current land uses that are likely to be affected by the Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure.

The consultant will identify PAPs and/or community assets coming within Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure affected areas after the cut-off date, and will notify the same to the NAWEC PIU and shall remove such properties or community structures from the site, through appropriate and meaningful consultation with the PAPs and shall inform them that any project benefits do not apply to them and will inform them of the Grievance Mechanism should the PAP wish to grieve the decision.

5) Distribution of Identity Files: After finalization of verification the consultant shall distribute identity files to all PAPs. The identity file will include a picture of the head or heads of the household, the extent of loss, and entitlement[4] i.e. compensation and resettlement assistance, as applicable. The identity files are to be signed by the following persons: the PAP, Field Officer of the Consultant, and a safeguard officer of the NAWEC PIU. This information will be reflected in the dynamic map of the Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure sites to associate each PAP with a plot of land on the map.

6) The final RAP shall include the following:  category of household, asset lost, compensation and all types of assistance, alternate livelihood options, details of resettlement including impacts of resettlement/livelihoods on vulnerable people in the household (including women and other members), specific training requirement for improving skills, and institutions responsible for training.

7) Training and Support for Income Restoration: In addition to assistance given in the entitlement package, the consultant shall be responsible for training and assistance of PAPs in establishing linkages with government programs.

The consultant shall consult with PAPs whose livelihoods are adversely impacted as a result of land acquisition and will discuss with them on livelihood options that meet their needs, including skills development needs and income restoration programs. The consultant shall prepare individual Income/Livelihood Restoration Plans, as a part of the RAP. The consultant shall assist the PAPs to establish linkages with Government departments, district administration, etc., and ensure that PAPs are included in the development schemes, as applicable especially with reference to vulnerable groups, for senior citizens, widow pensions, schemes for women or women-headed households, persons with disabilities, and other vulnerable individuals. The Consultant shall coordinate with the training institutes as identified in the RAP.

This should be inclusive of livelihoods of women and other members who may be impacted by resettlement.  Please reflect.

8) Disbursement of Assistance and Delivery of Entitlements: The consultant shall assist NAWEC in ensuring all the household obtain their full entitlements under the RAP before being physically relocated, to ensure all benefits owed to the PAPs are provided to them, as per the requirements of the RAP. Where options are available, the consultant shall provide advice to PAPs on the relative benefits of each option. The consultant shall assist the PAPs in opening bank accounts explaining the implications, the rules, and the obligations of a joint account and how she/he can access the resources she/he is entitled to, as per the RAP.

9) Relocation: The consultant shall assist the project authorities in ensuring a smooth transition and guide the households through the resettlement period. In consultation with the PAPs, the consultant shall inform the NAWEC PIU about the date of relocation as suggested by PAPs The consultant shall advise the PAPs on utilizing resettlement benefits to create productive assets. The consultant will verify files or documents proving the disbursement of the money or any kind of assistance. The funds will be disbursed against the approved plan for creating a productive asset.

 

10) Grievance Mechanism: The consultant shall make PAPs aware of the grievance mechanism as set out in the RAP and shall assist them to resolve the grievances using this process. The consultant shall always help PAPs to file a grievance application while ensuring professionalism and ethical conduct so that PAPs do not feel pressured or that the process is otherwise compromised. The consultant will not interfere with the decision of a PAP to use the GM and will provide timely information to ensure accessibility of the GM. Special measures to assist vulnerable groups such as illiterate, women, persons with disabilities and the elderly will be developed to ensure they have access to the GM.

The consultant shall record the grievance using the grievance monitoring log provided in the RAP and bring the grievance notice to the Grievance Redress Committee (GRC) within 3 (three) days of receipt of the grievance from the PAPs. The GRC shall write a draft recommendation of resolution of the grievance to NAWEC’s safeguards for their consideration.  NAWEC’s safeguards team may follow this recommendation or amend it for presentation or submission to the GRC meeting.

11) Coordination between PAPs and NAWEC:  The consultant shall facilitate consultation between the PAPs and the NAWEC PIU. This will be archived through meetings with both the NAWEC representatives and the PAPs.  All consultations and meetings will be accurately documented, noting date, place, attendees, key outcomes, and concerns, including photo records.

12)  Conduct Public Information Campaign: The consultant shall assist the NAWEC PIU to undertake public information campaign at the commencement of the project to inform the affected communities regarding the Resettlement action plan and as per the communication strategy for the project.

13) Awareness Creation on Gender Mainstreaming and Systemic inequalities:  Consultant shall carry out awareness programs in the Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure affected areas addressing gender mainstreaming and systemic inequality issues.

The information/outreach materials (videos, flyers, documents) as well as technical advice from NAWEC PIU, and the WB will be utilized in a timely manner. The consultant will submit to NAWEC PIU an outreach plan that includes the frequency of engagement, dates of execution, partners to assist in community and worker outreach (such as Department of Women’s Affairs, Ministry of Youth, Culture and Sport, policing, and others).

 

 

 

VIII. CONDITION OF SERVICES

a) Duration of Services

The timeline for initiating the RAP implementation will be provided by the PIU. From initiation, the duration of the services will be for six months. The consultant shall help NAWEC PIU in all other matters deemed necessary to implement the RAP in its spirit and entirety.

All documents prepared, generated, or collected during the period of the contract, in carrying out the services under this assignment will be the property of NAWEC. No information gathered or generated during and in carrying out this assignment shall be disclosed by the consultant without explicit written permission of the NAWEC.

b) Location of the Consultant

In order to carry out the above tasks, employees of the consultant will be stationed at a location mutually agreed with NAWEC.

c) Reporting

Reports are to be submitted to NAWEC PIU. All supporting documents such as photographs, video graphs, maps, primary and secondary information collected, etc., taken during the assignment shall be submitted in support of the reports, along with an electronic copy of the documents. The following deliverables must be submitted:

i) Inception Report: The consultant shall submit to the NAWEC PIU an inception report detailing the plan of action, human resources deployment, time schedule, and detailed methodology, within 21 working days of the commencement of the assignment. The monthly progress report must be submitted before 10th of the following month.

ii) Monthly and Quarterly Progress Reports: The consultant shall also submit monthly progress reports on the activities carried out during that month and proposed activities for the next month. The monthly progress reports shall include data on input and output indicators as required by NAWEC, with work charts as against the scheduled timeframe of RAP implementation. All progress reports shall include data on input and output indicators as required by the NAWEC. Consultant shall also submit Quarterly progress report depicting all the aforesaid details. The quarterly progress report shall be submitted on or before 10th of the first month in the following quarter.

The reports will contain:

  • A start-up report presenting an analysis of the situation and details of the proposed intervention strategy (i.e., methodological note, roadmap)
  • A monthly activity report to be submitted by the 10th of each month, highlighting, among other things, the progress of the operations, the sensitive issues or challenges identified, the status of the conflicts encountered, and the resolutions proposed, the meetings held, decisions made, etc. These reports will be approved by the World Bank and European Investment before payment.

d) Monthly Work Plan: The work plan for each coming month shall be submitted in the monthly meeting along with that of the current month clearly showing site visits, targets v/s achievements, and various other elements.

The consultant shall document in full detail, the consultation processes, and a full description of the training imparted (or facilitated) as part of the assignment. The progress archived in land acquisition as per entitlements shall be documented and shall be submitted to the NAWEC PIU as a part of the monthly progress report.

e) Status Reports: The consultant shall prepare and submit the status report in consultation with NAWEC PIU and submit it to WB during mission visit. Consultant shall also prepare PowerPoint presentation on the status report during WB mission visit in consultation with NAWEC PIU as and when required during the entire contract period. Given that the funder will have a mission visit about every six months, it is preferable that the consultant prepare a status report at least one month before every mission visit.

f) Draft Final Report: Consultant shall submit a Draft Completion Report at the end of the contract period summarizing the actions taken during the project, the methods used to carry out the assignment, and a summary of support, compensation and assistance given to the PAPs (a guideline content of the Final Report is given in Appendix).

g) Final Report: Consultant shall submit final completion report complying all the remarks/comments of NAWEC PIU, the World Bank on Draft Final Report at the end of the contract period summarizing the actions taken during the project, the methods used to carry out the assignment, and a summary of support, compensation and assistance given to the PAPs (a guideline content of the Final Report is given in Appendix).

h) Participation in Periodic Review Meeting of PIU: Consultant’s Team Leader shall participate in the periodic review meetings of the PIU to discuss the progress of the assigned tasks, issues, and constraints in carrying out any specific task, etc.

i) Submission of Meeting Records: Minutes of the meeting shall be prepared for all the meetings with NAWEC PIU and PAPs, GRC Meetings, various consultations with the PAPs, consultations with respect to shifting of community assets, joint verification of affected land and structures, etc., shall need to be recorded and submitted to the NAWEC PIU.

j) Submission of Micro Plans: All micro plans (this includes the resettlement plan, livelihood restoration plan, capacity building plan, and others) must be submitted, with the status of disbursement and payment of compensation, on a monthly basis. Where changes occur during the project implementation, the consultant will update the relevant Micro Plans and resubmit them to the NAWEC PIU.

k) Data, Services and Facilities to be provided by the Client: The NAWEC PIU will provide to the consultant copies of the Transmission and Distribution network infrastructure Resettlement Action Plan, PAP database, land acquisition details, and any other relevant and available reports/data related to the respective project.

l) Time Schedule

It is estimated that the consultancy services shall be required for a period of minimum six months. The consultant shall carry out all assigned tasks based on the milestones as set out by NAWEC. The period of service shall be extended, if found necessary and based on the performance of the consultant, for a period mutually agreed upon by both the parties (NAWEC and the consultant / the consultancy firm).

m) Payment

All payments will be linked to the completion of tasks as per milestones assigned by NAWEC which will be provided upon awarding of the contract. The payment to the consultant will be made against outputs as given above, and per the payment schedule.

n) Team for the Assignment

The NGO/consultant firm shall dedicate a team of professionals to the site. The constitution of the Core Team and their required qualification and experience shall be as follows.

Position
Number of Positions

 

Qualification/Experience

 

Project Manager / Team Leader

 

1 Project Manager/Team Leader should be a post-graduate, preferably in social sciences with a financial management background. S/he should have 10 years’ experience in the implementation of resettlement plans and development of reports with good knowledge of GIS and mapping of Project affected area and PAP plots of land. S/he should have held a responsible position in the previous assignments and should possess participatory management skills. Knowledge of local language (Mandinka) will be a good asset.
Social Specialists as Community Facilitators

 

2 The social specialists should have a graduate or post-graduate or equivalent in social sciences with at least five years of field experience. They shall have experience in the implementation of resettlement in project development works with knowledge of prevailing resettlement policies including WB policies, and knowledge of gender issues and/or GBV. Should have at least five years of experience in community consultation (including one with demonstrated experience with gender-sensitive consultation approaches and working with women community members to create safe spaces for discussion). Knowledge of the local language and experience of working in The Gambia is desired.

At least one of the social specialists will be a woman to be able to conduct meetings with women, especially as it relates to gender-inclusive practices and GBV

At least one of the social specialists shall have knowledge about good financial management practices and skills development/training.

Land acquisition facilitator

 

1 Should have knowledge of the Gambia’s Land Acquisition and Compensation Act and land acquisition process, prevailing resettlement policies including WB policies and its implementation. They should have 5 years working experience on land acquisition issues and facilitating discussions between various stakeholders related to land acquisition.
Land Acquisition Specialist

 

1 Should be a graduate or equivalent in the social sciences with five years field experience in Land Acquisition, using maps to identify PAP assets, should have knowledge of prevailing land acquisition and compensation Act and WB policies.

 

APPENDICES

CONTENTS OF FINAL REPORT for the Safeguards (RAP) Implementing Consultancy Firm

  1. Introduction
  2. Background of the Project
  3. Action Plan for RAP Implementation

 

  1. Details of joint verification

 

  1. Status of distribution of ID files

 

  1. Details of consultations carried out with PAPs (including a summary of key questions, concerns and answers by the team to the PAPs; list of names)
  2. Training and Support given to PAPs for income restoration
  3. Coordination with Government Departments
  4. Linkages with suitable schemes
  5. Identification of skill sets of PAPs
  6. Details of training imparted
  7. Outcome of training

 

  1. Disbursement of compensation package

 

  1. Grievance Mechanism including SEA/SH Action Plan

 

  1. Awareness on HIV/AIDS/GBV/SEA/SH/VAC Prevention
  2. Tools and methods
  3. Information Education and Communication
  4. Interaction with communities and sensitization
  5. Awareness programs
  6. Details of medical health care services including STI treatment facilitates
  7. Details of coordination with Target Intervention NGOs and other agencies working in the field of HIV/AIDS/GBV/SEA/VAC awareness and prevention
  8. Details of sensitization programs for contractors and other stakeholders
  9. Details of social marketing of condoms and other prophylaxis

 

  1. Details of Consultation in Scheduled Area
  2. Consultation with Affected Households
  3. Consultation with Community and Key Stakeholders

 

  1. Awareness creation of gender equality and other social issues
  2. Awareness creation on gender equality issues and other social issues
  3. Health care facilities and working conditions of women in construction sites

 

  1. Achievement of targets (physical and financial)

 

  1. Summary and way forward

 

[1] SCADA: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

[2]Women frequently suffer disproportionately in resettlement, as they are often a disproportionately large number of the poor; have more limited access to resources, opportunities, and public services than men; and as a result, rely more heavily on informal support networks within their existing communities. The resettlement planning process needs to consider the situation of women and to adapt the engagement process as necessary to ensure that women have a role in decision making. A comprehensive planning process includes identification of (a) women’s means of income generation and livelihoods, including non-formal activities such as gathering natural resources, or trading and bartering services and wares; (b) women’s social and economic networks, including extended family ties; and (c) women’s ownership of affected assets, including land and crops, in order to appropriately compensate them.

 

[4] This should be inclusive of the livelihoods of women and other members who may be impacted by resettlement.  Please reflect.

 

 

 

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (REOI) (CONSULTING SERVICES – FIRMS SELECTION) WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL SOLAR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (PHASE 1)

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (REOI)

(CONSULTING SERVICES – FIRMS SELECTION)

WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL

SOLAR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (PHASE 1)

Grant Nº: D3320

Project Identification No: P162580

Reference No:  BJ-WAPP-102165-CS-QCBS

Country: Multinational-West African Power Pool (The Gambia)

 

Assignment Title: Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) for a 150 MWp Regional Solar Park in The Gambia

The WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL (WAPP), a specialized institution of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), headquartered in Cotonou, Republic of Benin, has received financing from the World Bank toward the cost of the Solar development in Sub-Saharan Africa project (Phase I) and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consulting services.

The Consulting services (“the Services”) include the preparation of a detailed Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) report comprising an Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP), and a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) for the identified site(s) of the Solar Park with Storage and the transmission lines between the Park and the utility substation.

 

The overall objective is to identify and assess the environmental and social impacts and risks inherent in the implementation of the project and prepare an ESMP by screening, scoping, defining baseline scenarios, predicting impacts, and developing robust and applicable management and monitoring plans to avoid, mitigate or remedy them according to the World Bank safeguards policies.

 

Specifically, the Services, among others, has to help : (i) validate from an environmental and social point of view the identified site(s), the transmission lines between the Park and the utility substation; (ii) develop an ESIA, ESMP, and a RAP after site (s) validation in order to obtain the “Environmental Permits” and “Funding Approvals” for the construction of the 150 MWp regional solar power plant ; (iii) identify all impacts on the biological, physical, economic, social and human environments and analyse the risks/variants/alternatives for the project; (iv) develop a Public Consultation Plan (PCP) and the Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM) for the construction phase; (v) prevent an environmental degradation (safety and hygiene management) of the site (s) and the deterioration of the living environment of the populations after completion of the project.

 

The Consultant shall work closely with the consulting team responsible for the feasibility study and the Transaction Advisory Services to ensure the timely completion of the studies under this consultancy.

The total execution period of the assignment is estimated at 34 weeks i.e. eight and a half (8.5) months after the start of the services. The scheduled start date for the mission is December 2020.

The detailed Terms of Reference (TOR) for the assignment can be found at the following WAPP website: http://www.ecowapp.org/en/tenders

Please note that these TOR are indicative and could change before the publication of the Request for Proposals.

The WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL now invites eligible consulting firms (“Consultants”) to indicate their interest in providing the Services. Interested Consultants should provide information demonstrating that they have the required qualifications and relevant experience to perform the Services.

Shortlisting Criteria

The Shortlisting Criteria are:

  • Successfully completion of at least five (5) similar assignments (solar, thermal and hydroelectric power plants of at least 10 MW and on more than 100 ha), and two similar line studies project (HV power line of at least 90 kV on at least 10 km)
  • Strong experience in ESIA for similar solar park projects and the preparation of associated RAP and ESMP successfully completed over the last 10 years;
  • Good knowledge of The Gambia’s laws and regulations on land management and public utility expropriation and demonstrated capacity in environmental and social studies, gender-based violence and land management issues including the World Bank’s environmental and social safeguards policies on land acquisition/use/restrictions and involuntary resettlement;
  • Availability of in-house staff with strong technical and ESIA expertise with proven capabilities in developing solar ESIA projects in accordance with sustainable development principles. The firm must count with at least 3 keys out 8 specialists whose expertise may be called upon for the Services as part of its permanent staff.
  • Provide information about the references provided.
  • Good knowledge of the West African region

 

Key Experts will not be evaluated at the shortlisting stage.

The attention of the interested Consultants is drawn to Section III, paragraphs 3.14, 3.16 and 3.17 of the “Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers”, World Bank Edition, July 2016 Edition (revised in November 2017 and August 2018) (“Procurement Regulations“), setting out the World Bank’s policy on conflicts of interest.

Consultants may associate with other firms to enhance their qualifications and shall indicate clearly whether the association is in the form of a joint-venture and/or a sub-consultancy. In the case of a joint venture, all the partners in the joint venture shall be jointly and severally liable for the entire contract, if selected.

A Consultant will be selected in accordance with the “Quality and Cost-based Selection” method set out in the Consultant Guidelines.

Expressions of interest must be submitted in writing in English. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, submissions must be done in PDF format and delivered by email only before September 21, 2020 (10:00 am  Cotonou time) to the WAPP Secretariat procurement email address: procurement@ecowapp.org

 

Due to the COVID-19, hard copies shall not be accepted, and any hard copy sent to the WAPP Secretariat will be rejected. Proposals received by the WAPP after the expiry date  indicated above will be rejected

Expressions of Interest must clearly bear in the email subject the mention: “EOI – ESIA for a 150 MWp Regional Solar Park in The Gambia -Ref:  BJ-WAPP-102165-CS-QCBS”.

Expressions without the subject mention above may not be identified on time as such we strongly recommend that all applicants follow the above instruction.

Applicants wishing to participate in the opening of applications received, which will be hosted online, should send a request to the address below to Mr Mouhamadou S. Diedhiou via msdiedhiou@ecowapp.org no later than September 14, 2020, and the link to join the virtual meeting will be communicated to them. Answers to questions can be obtained by sending them to andorere@ecowapp.org; copies to  msdiedhiou@ecowapp.org ; bhessou@ecowapp.org; shouessou@ecowapp.org; mmodjinou@ecowapp.org

 

The Minutes of the opening session of the expressions of interest that were received will be communicated to all bidders immediately after the event.

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (REOI) (CONSULTING SERVICES – FIRMS SELECTION) WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL SOLAR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (PHASE 1)

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (REOI)

(CONSULTING SERVICES – FIRMS SELECTION)

WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL

SOLAR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (PHASE 1)

Grant Nº: D3320

Project Identification No: P162580

Reference No:  BJ-WAPP-102167-CS-QCBS

Country: Multinational-West African Power Pool (The Gambia)

 

Assignment Title: Transaction Advisor Services for the development of a 150 MWp Regional Solar Park in The Gambia

The WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL (WAPP), a specialized institution of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), headquartered in Cotonou, Republic of Benin, has received financing from the World Bank toward the cost of the Solar development in Sub-Saharan Africa project (Phase I) and intends to apply part of the proceeds for consulting services.

The Consulting Services (“the Services”) include Transaction Advisor (TA) to support the development of a 150 MWp Regional Solar Park with Storage in The Gambia. The overall objective is to design a solar auction system in The Gambia for the selection of one or more IPPs to finance, construct and operate the Regional Solar Park.

Contractually, the transactional advisory support for the solar auction is divided into two (2) phases, of which the second is optional. The first (1st) phase focuses on the design of an auction and financial structuring for which the WAPP is the fiduciary client and the second (2nd) phase of support to the launch and smooth running of the auction for which the Government of The Gambia is the fiduciary client.

In Phase 1, the Transaction Advisor will be required to perform/provide, among others, the

  1. legal due diligence of the Regional Solar Park in The Gambia;
  2. Evaluation of Commercial Contracts and Drafting of Contracts;
  3. state to the art advice on the structure of the contractual arrangements
  4. present working models and tools for the management and implementation of the project;
  5. financial due diligence;
  6. the auction process and its documentation;
  7. the evaluation and preparation of Contracts/agreements including commercial Contracts and prepare all key documents such as the Concession Agreement, the Power Transmission Contract, the Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) and the Direct Agreement (together with the “Project Contracts”) and organize consultations with the private sector and the Government to ensure the direction of the auction.
  8. consultation with the private sector in coordination with the Government;
  9. capacity building of stakeholders.

The Transaction Advisor will be required in Phase 2 to provide support to the bidding process and the selection of the auction winner. This phase, which may be the subject of a separate contract to be signed with The Government of The Gambia, is optional and will only be awarded after satisfactory completion of Phase 1 services and subject to the availability of funding and the procurement rules of the parties concerned. Consultants are, however, required to submit a proposal for this phase (Phase 2).

Phase 2 will cover, among others, the

  1. supporting the IPP pre-screening process;
  2. supporting the tendering process;
  3. supporting the bid evaluation of bids;
  4. tract negotiation phase and required support to financial close.

 

The Consultant for the TA shall work closely with the consulting team responsible for the Feasibility Study (FS) and the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) to ensure the timely completion of the studies under this consultancy.

The level of effort of key personnel required for Phase 1 is estimated at 18 man-months and the total mission implementation period is estimated at 20 weeks after the signing of the contract. For the optional phase (Phase 2), the level of effort is estimated at 19 man-months for a duration of 6 months. The tentative planned start date of the mission is March 2021.

The detailed Terms of Reference (TOR) for the assignment can be found at the following WAPP website: http://www.ecowapp.org/en/tenders

Please note that these TOR are indicative and could change before the publication of the Request for Proposals.

The WEST AFRICAN POWER POOL now invites eligible consulting firms (“Consultants”) to indicate their interest in providing the Services. Interested Consultants should provide information demonstrating that they have the required qualifications and relevant experience to perform the Services.

 The Shortlisting Criteria are:

  1. Successful completion of at least two similar assignments as Transaction Advisor for renewable energy infrastructure projects including legal and regulatory due diligence;
  2. Successful completion of at least two similar assignments as Transaction Advisor for a solar PV project, which included management of the tendering process under a Public-Private Partnership (PPP), including preparation of the tender documents, assistance in contract award and provision of advisory services until the financial close of the project;
  3. Successful completion of the development of solar auctions for the selection of IPP(s);
  4. Successful completion of at least two financial analysis assignments, with relevant project finance experience through to financial close for power generation projects either funded by public resources (Government budget and support from TFP) or private investments (various formats of PPP with private sector participation);
  5. Experience in the technical design of solar PV Park with storage and evaluation of tariff;
  6. Experience in the West African electricity sub-sector.

Key Experts will not be evaluated at the shortlisting stage.

The attention of the interested Consultants is drawn to Section III, paragraphs 3.14, 3.16 and 3.17 of the “Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers”, World Bank Edition, July 2016 Edition (revised in November 2017 and August 2018) (“Procurement Regulations“), setting out the World Bank’s policy on conflicts of interest.

Consultants may associate with other firms to enhance their qualifications and shall indicate clearly whether the association is in the form of a joint-venture and/or a sub-consultancy. In the case of a joint venture, all the partners in the joint venture shall be jointly and severally liable for the entire contract, if selected.

A Consultant will be selected in accordance with the “Quality and Cost-based Selection” method set out in the Consultant Guidelines.

Expressions of interest must be submitted in writing in English. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, submissions must be done in PDF format and delivered by email only before October 05, 2020 (10:00 am  Cotonou time) to the WAPP Secretariat procurement email address: procurement@ecowapp.org

 

The opening of received expressions will take place On October 5, 2020 at 10:30 am Cotonou time.

 

Due to the COVID-19, hard copies shall not be accepted, and any hard copy sent to the WAPP Secretariat will be rejected. Proposals received by the WAPP after the expiry date indicated above will be rejected.

Expressions of Interest must clearly bear in the email subject the mention: “EOI – Transaction Advisor Services for a 150 MWp Regional Solar Park in The Gambia -Ref:  BJ-WAPP-102167-CS-QCBS”.

Expressions without the subject mention above may not be identified on time as such we strongly recommend that all applicants follow the above instruction.

Applicants wishing to participate in the opening of applications received, which will be hosted online using Microsoft Teams, should send a request to the address below to Mr Mouhamadou S. Diedhiou via msdiedhiou@ecowapp.org no later than September 28, 2020, and the link to join the virtual meeting will be communicated to them. Answers to questions can be obtained by sending them to andorere@ecowapp.org; copies to  msdiedhiou@ecowapp.org; bhessou@ecowapp.org; hchaibi@ecowapp.org; mmodjinou@ecowapp.org;   

The Minutes of the opening session of the expressions of interest that were received will be communicated to all bidders immediately after the opening event.

GAMBIA ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT (GERMP) Terms of Reference Gender Focal Point – Project Implementation Unit

GAMBIA ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT (GERMP)

Terms of Reference

Gender Focal Point – Project Implementation Unit

 

CONTEXT

Despite the commitment of the Government of The Gambia towards gender equality women still make up the majority of the poor and extremely poor and are faced with many disparities including in access to education, healthcare, and salaried employment. In addition, women have limited access to resources such as land and financing and their rate of participation in the labor force is only 37.8 percent as compared to 53.2 for men. The following gender gaps have been identified:

 

Education: Gender disparities exist in literacy, access to education (especially post-secondary), and employment and this disparity is larger is rural areas. In The Gambia, 65.9 percent of the male population aged 15 years or above is literate compared to 45.0 percent of females. Over the last years, women in urban areas have been closing the gap in terms of literacy as shown by literacy rates of younger cohorts (15-19-year-old 72.2% and 78.3% for women and men, respectively. With the abolition of informal school levies in 2014 and the introduction of School Improvement Grants, significant gains have been made in education for both sexes. Primary Net Enrollment Rates increased from 68% in 200, 70.1% in 2014 to 81.1% in 2018. The Gambia has achieved gender parity in access to education at all levels, except higher education. However, regional disparities exist. Whereas the urban areas are registering nearly universal access to lower basic education, the most deprived rural region (Central River Region) has a GER of 63%. Despite this national track record, overall completion rates still favor boys: the primary completion rate for boys stands at 82% compared to 66% for girls in 2015. Data from the Integrated Household Survey (IHS) 2015/16 show that a third of primary school-age children (7-12 years) have never attended school, and the incidence is higher in rural areas compared to urban areas. The situation is further exacerbated among children from the poorest quintile, and the regions farthest away from the capital. Major challenges remain, especially in improving quality, relevance, and retention.

 

The challenges that adolescent girls face in the Gambia are as varied as their backgrounds, and their situation is often exacerbated by their economic status, social support systems, socio-cultural practices such as early marriage, teenage pregnancy, domestic workload, and gender-based violence and discrimination.  As such, the ratio of girls’ to boys’ attendance of secondary school does not yet match that of primary school enrolment. Only 87 girls out of every 100 boys attend secondary school – that indicates a 13% gap in gender parity (UNICEF).

 

Poverty and wealth: The Human Development Report derives the GNI/capita of male and female members of the population based on the ratio of female to male wages, and female and male shares of the economically active population. In The Gambia, the estimated female GNI per capita is 800, in 2011 PPP $, which is only 37 percent of the male GNI per capita (2,190 PPP US$).

 

Labor and occupation: as noted above, men are more likely to participate in the labor force. Furthermore, the rate of unemployment for females doubles that of males 12.6 versus 6.7 percent, respectively. Most women (59 percent) work in service, 37 percent in agriculture, and only 4 percent in industry. In comparison, 51 percent of males work in service, 24 percent in agriculture, and 25 percent in industry. In particular, there is a significant gap in women’s employment in sectors where a higher level of education is required, including also the energy sector where men’s share is 74% share versus 26% for women.  For example, at NAWEC only 4 women engineers and 9 technicians are employed, which altogether accounts for less than 1 percent of the staff or less than 0.5% of new hires. Some other structures such as the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy (MoPE), Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) or REAGAM have no women employed as engineers. Despite skills training being more accessible to the wider population as secondary education is required to access skill training, women nevertheless represent less than 2% of the technicians at the utility, magnifying the disparities in access to secondary education for women. Other specific gaps within the sector are outlined in Table 1.

Gender equality: The Constitution accords both men and women full and equal rights, however, gender discrimination remains in the areas of adoption, marriage, divorce, burial, devolution of property on death or other matters of personal law. There are various institutional structures promoting gender equality in the Gambia, which include the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, a cross-sectoral National Women’s Council and Women’s Bureau, a National Policy for the Advancement of Gambian Women, and a 2010-2020 National Gender and Women Empowerment Policy which focuses on the critical areas of concern as outlined by the Beijing Platform for Action[1], including poverty reduction, women’s empowerment, education, and human rights and governance. The Government allocates a budget to the women’s affairs. The Government of the Gambia has ratified several International Declarations, and Conventions including the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa. It has not ratified the Optional Protocol on violence against women. The effects of these inequalities are evident in key statistics related to women. For example, according to the 2013 Gambian Demographic and Health Survey 20% of women reported experiencing physical or sexual violence at least once during their lifetime, child marriage is estimated to be at 30%, and female genital mutilation/cutting currently hovers around 75%, one of the highest rates in the world.

OBJECTIVE OF ASSIGNMENT

The objective of this consultancy is to provide technical support to the Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization (GERMP) with regards to the commitments made under the project to close gender gaps related (i.e. women’s employment and skills development and build on the ongoing activities). Entry points in relation to which the consultant is expected to support are components 2 and 3 under the project. This includes:

 

  • Scaling up training to women to provide enhanced technical skills development to enable their employment in the energy and water sector
  • Scaling up the recruitment of female staff in electricity restoration and modernization activities and as frontline service providers within the renewable energy sector for installation and maintenance of solar equipment
  • Continuing to collect sex-disaggregated data to monitor progress and assess the impact of the gender-targeted interventions and enable iterations if needed for an impactful implementation.
  • Overseeing risk monitoring to ensure that risks and interventions are identified to prevent, mitigate, and respond to cases of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) and Sexual Harassment (SH) in the project activities[2].

 

Components 2 and 3: The restoration and modernization of the energy sector includes project related to activities such as the construction of transmission lines, generation and distribution of electricity, along with the construction and installation of the solar PV plants in urban and rural areas. These activities presents great employment opportunities potential for women, especially in skilled/technical roles. (This can contribute to meaningful employment with potential for upward mobility and labor inclusiveness in the energy sector in The Gambia. The project will assess the existing barriers and challenges to employment including the pathway of school-to-work transition to ensure that women can access the training and support needed to join the energy and water sectors. NAWEC will address the recruitment, retention, and promotion for women, by focusing on, among other things: (i) gender stereotypes and norms; (ii) mobility and workplace safety issues; (iii) lack of mentors; (iv) limited networks due to small numbers of women working in the sector; (v) issues maintaining work-life balance and care burden; (vi) gender wage gaps; and (vii) sexual harassment, sexual exploitation and abuse, and other safety concerns.

The project will place the focus on actions such as (i) provision of scholarships for academic energy-related education to improve the representation of women engineers and technicians in the sector; and (ii) actions to support capacity building for women in solar isolation, installation and maintenance. The project will contribute to foster and scale up women’s empowerment through the Renewable Energy Access Model, based on the model provided by the Mbolo Women Training Center in The Gambia. Women who graduate from the center are qualified for solar installation and maintenance and could be recruited by private sector companies, including those participating in the project. Table 1 below provides an overview of the main topics and potential activities in the Gender Action Plan.

Table 1. Potential Activities within the Gender Action Plan

Identified Gap Proposed Action Proposed Indicator
a) Barriers for women to be employed in the energy and water sectors

b) Lack of inclusion of gender dimensions of energy and water service delivery

 

a)      Baseline assessment of barriers for women to being hired and employed in the energy and water sectors (hiring practices, school-to-work transition, workplace policies, work environment, etc.) as well as on gender dimensions within the sector

b)      Consultations and trainings on gender for management/staff of key institutions (NAWEC, PURA, MoPE, GNPC, etc.), including HR focal points

c)      Inclusion of gender in all strategic studies under the project, further stratified by geographic location and other markers

a) The existence of gender strategies and policies in place

b) Number of staff trained on gender disparities, the importance of women in the water/energy sector, etc.

c) Number of studies

Low number of women engineers and limited career opportunities for women in NAWEC

 

a)      Internship program and preferential hiring

b)      Training, stipends, and mentorship opportunities for female staff to boost internal promotion

c)      Reserved places for female staff in any training offered under the project

d)      Women trained in supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) energy management system

a) 15 or more percent of women among NAWEC engineers

b) Number of women benefitting from training on core aspects

Weak pipeline of technical female staff joining NAWEC and other institutions a)      Outreach activities to high schools, universities and career fairs including promotional campaigns to enhance the interest and awareness in STEM subjects/energy sector employment, and to inform about scholarship opportunities

b)      Scholarship fund

a) Number of scholarships given to women

 

Limited number of women working in skilled positions in the renewable energy sector

 

a)      Training program for installation and maintenance of solar equipment

b)      Partnerships with firms under the project committed to hiring women trained

a) Number of firms with explicit commitment to hire women trained

 

b) Number of firms who hire at least 5% of more

women technicians in firms participating in the project

 

 

Scope of Work:

As a part of efforts to address gender gaps in the energy sector in The Gambia, a Gender Assessment and Action Plan needs to be developed to enhance attention and focus on the issue of gender equality and inequities and the contributions the energy sector can make toward this national and sector goals, as well as contribute to working towards global goals to achieve gender equality and empowerment as committed to in the Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs).”. The Gender Assessment and Action plan will be developed using the following methods: desk literature review, key informant interviews (including university and high school professors/teachers/administrators across different regions) and client consultations, where possible, to better understand what good practices could be implemented in the sector. The activity aims to ultimately design interventions to be implemented with counterparts in public-sector entities, such as Ministries, as well as relevant other donors, private sector entities and NGOs. The focus of this assignment will be to design the programs and initiatives as part of the GERMP activities in The Gambia with the client counterparts. The goal is not to duplicate similar efforts, but rather to fill gaps where they exist and point to areas where there are the greatest opportunity for impact on gender equality in the energy and water sector. The consultant will be expected to engage very closely with the World Bank project team members as the project components are implemented so priorities and delivery modalities align.

Table 1: Detailed Tasks, Approaches and Outputs

Task Approach/Methodology Output
1.0 GENDER INCLUSION IN THE ENERGY SECTOR GAPS ASSESSMENT    

 

1.1 Stocktaking
·        Take stock of relevant documents, data points and other information related to gender gaps relevant to the energy sector and GERMP activities. Identified areas of interest include gender disparities in education in particular within STEM, relevant policies, female leadership, labor-force participation rates, etc. within the energy- and water sectors.

 

·        Identify and conduct a stocktaking in the form of a written assessment of initiatives in the Gambia focused on gender equality and inequity that are relevant to the GERMP project, with a focus on approaches that could work for WB clients and operations.

 

·        Identify areas of where discrimination including social and workplace attitudes, biases (both unconscious or overt biases) may contribute to barriers and examples of how other sectors/organizations have dealt with them to help create a safe, inclusive and supportive working environment for all, free from Sexual Harassment (SH) and Sexual Exploitation and Abuse.

 

·        Ensure that gendered risks including Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) and Sexual Harassment (SH) are adequately identified, analyzed, and addressed in project safeguards documents by ensuring the identification and oversight of a consultant with technical expertise in SEA/SH issues.

 

Desk review and outreach to relevant internal and external networks.  Use of primary and secondary research. Gender gap assessment report and PPT slide deck key findings and recommendations.
1.2  Key Informant Interviews
·     The consultant will interview a selection of key informants, with an eye to different types of interventions as well as a range of relevant institutions.   In-person or virtual interviews (phone, video conferencing, etc.) Summary of key points in interviews (full transcripts to be kept confidentially by PIU) noting key concerns, suggestions, and input into gender gap assessment.
 

2.0 ACTION PLAN OF POTENTIAL GENDER INTERVENTIONS

 

      2.1  Draft Action Plan
·   Draft an action plan based on the gaps and opportunities that have been identified to enhance gender equality and meaningful gender inclusion in the energy sector. The plan needs to focus on the components of the GERMP outlined above and provide practical recommendations for each component. The document will outline delivery modalities, possible partnerships (e.g. educational institutions, women’s associations, donors etc.) and budget implications.  Collation and synthesis, with a focus on distilling practical and good approaches in a draft action plan for client counterparts (the energy sector more broadly in the absence of a sector strategy). Draft action plan
2.2 Consultation on Action Plan    
Host half-day workshop focused on consultation and agreement for the gender action plan for GERMP with relevant counterparts.

 

Submission of final action plan expected after workshop.

 

 

Invite list to be drafted by consultant and draft agenda to be delivered including organization of logistics etc., proposal for venue, etc. to be submitted to PIU Workshop summary and final gender action plan. One media / communications output expected after the event.
3.0  ACTIONS OF THE PROGRAMS

 

   
3.1          Action Plan Implementation
Based on the action plan and consultation should lead design of tailored interventions for GERMP e.g. deliver of a behaviors, norms, bias awareness training for energy sector stakeholders, design of women’s scholarship program, assist in the development of internship- and skills development programs, etc. Consult labor/HR unit in NAWEC to discuss and assess current policies and trainings and how these can be adapted, gaps, opportunities for gender inclusion.

 

Provide program design support to NAWEC. To be defined after delivery of action plan.
3.2 Advisory Support    
Provide advisory support to the stakeholders on operationalizing the action plan for GERMP Additional Financing project. Consultation with NAWEC as needed. When asked, provide briefing and advisory notes/recommendations, participate in calls/meetings, etc.

 

Activities and deliverables

The consultant will lead the in-country gender equality work within the GERMP Project Implementation Unit (PIU).  Key tasks will include:

  • Design a detailed action plan for the gender actions to be supported through the GERMP, and to develop and monitor the various training and coordination activities.
  • Provide analytical support to the team on entry points related to gender as outlined under the GERMP. The first key area of focus will be assisting with data collection and mapping gender gaps related to employment and technical and non-technical roles.
  • Advisory support on the development of institutional gender policies for NAWEC.
  • Mapping and delivering capacity development and trainings needed across the energy sector. A training schedule will need to be designed and delivered.
  • Collate key findings from the Gender Action Plan to suggest actions for the PIU to build engagements both internally and with clients to strengthen the project design.
  • Support all project activities with input and support to in-country supervision and/or technical missions with the project funders (World Bank, European Investment Bank etc.), client dialogue, technical advice to policy development (primarily internally within NAWEC but potentially also at government level), etc.
  • Support knowledge management by creating learning and information sharing to document impact and outcomes at the project level as opportunities arise e.g. input to reports etc. for project teams, etc.
  • Provide oversight and support to the PIU to ensure that someone with adequate technical expertise on gendered risks including SEA/SH is identified and included in social evaluations and the development of key safeguards documents (and in the Gender Action Plan), and oversee their work to ensure that a SEA/SH prevention, mitigation, and response action plan is developed as part of the project’s Environmental and Social Management Plan.

 

Duration of Work

The initial assignment is one-year time-based contract, which can be extended upon an agreement between the Consultant and NAWEC.

 

Reporting and Timing       

The consultant will report to the PIU Coordinator. The consultant will work within the PIU, in consultation with local NGOs, the World Bank, and local gender focal points across the energy sector.

 

Criteria and Qualifications:

The consultant will have:

 

  • An advanced degree and a minimum of 10 years of direct and relevant experience
  • Relevant experience in developing gender engagement in projects and with various institutions in the public sector
  • Knowledge and familiarity of gender in the energy, water, and infrastructure sectors
  • Experience working directly with project teams and interacting with governments on gender, social issues and energy-related issues at the policy and institutional level
  • Experience with on dealing with institutional, labor, and social issues related to Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Exploitation and Abuse is preferred
  • Previous relevant working and/or research experience in The Gambia
  • Demonstrated ability for writing technical and analytical content in English
  • Ability to work virtually and attend meetings in offices as required
  • Availability to travel into rural areas for consultations as needed

[1] See https://beijing20.unwomen.org/~/media/headquarters/attachments/sections/csw/pfa_e_final_web.pdf

[2] This includes but is not limited to ensuring the hiring of consultants with adequate technical expertise to support the design, implementation, and quality assurance of key identified SEA/SH prevention, mitigation, and response activities.

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (CONSULTING SERVICES – INDIVIDUAL CONSULTANT’S SELECTION) – Recruitment of Gender Focal Person

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

(CONSULTING SERVICES –

INDIVIDUAL CONSULTANT’S SELECTION)

GAMBIA

ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT

Grant No.: GRANT NUMBER D309-GM

 

Assignment Title: Recruitment of Gender Focal Person

Reference No. GM-NAWEC-179856-CS-INDV

 

The GERMP additional financing, with the amount of USD 43 million, is currently under preparation and is approved by the World Bank Board of Executive Directors on June 29th 2020. This project, which expands the scope of the parent GERMP, aims to improve the operational performance of the National Water and Electricity Company (NAWEC), which provides electricity and water services throughout most of the country

 

Despite the commitment of the Government of The Gambia towards gender equality women still make up the majority of the poor and extremely poor and are faced with many disparities including in access to education, healthcare, and salaried employment. In addition, women have limited access to resources such as land and financing and their rate of participation in the labor force is only 37.8 percent as compared to 53.2 for men.

 

The objective of this consultancy is to provide technical support to the Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) with regards to the commitments made under the project to close gender gaps related (i.e. women’s employment and skills development and build on the ongoing activities). Entry points in relation to which the consultant is expected to support are components 2 and 3 under the project. This includes:

 

  • Scaling up training to women to provide enhanced technical skills development to enable their employment in the energy and water sector
  • Scaling up the recruitment of female staff in electricity restoration and modernization activities and as frontline service providers within the renewable energy sector for installation and maintenance of solar equipment
  • Continuing to collect sex-disaggregated data to monitor progress and assess the impact of the gender-targeted interventions and enable iterations if needed for an impactful implementation.
  • Overseeing risk monitoring to ensure that risks and interventions are identified to prevent, mitigate, and respond to cases of Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) and Sexual Harassment (SH) in the project activities.

 

The detailed Terms of Reference (TOR) for the assignment can be obtained from NAWEC’s Website: www.nawec.gm.

 

NAWEC now invites eligible individual consultants (“Consultants”) to indicate their interest in providing the Services. Interested consultants should provide information demonstrating that they have the required qualifications and relevant experience to perform the Services. Consultant’s Letter of Expression of Interest, CV, and the financial proposal shall be submitted to the address below.

 

Required qualifications.

The successful candidate is expected to have the following qualifications and experience:

 

  • An advanced degree and a minimum of 10 years of direct and relevant experience
  • Relevant experience in developing a Gender Engagement Plan (GEP) in projects and with various institutions in the public sector
  • Knowledge and ability to conduct Training workshops, Seminars and consultations of relevant gender issues to project staff and other project stakeholders (including PAPs)
  • Knowledge and familiarity of gender in the energy, water, and infrastructure sectors
  • Experience working directly with project teams and interacting with governments on gender, social issues and energy-related issues at the policy and institutional level
  • Experience with on dealing with institutional, labor, and social issues related to Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Sexual Exploitation and Abuse is preferred
  • Knowledge on survivor-centred Approach of handling and processing of GBV victims, particularly victims of SEA and SH.
  • Previous relevant working and/or research experience in The Gambia
  • Demonstrated ability for writing technical and analytical content in English
  • Ability to work virtually and attend meetings in offices as required
  • Availability to travel frequently into rural areas for consultations as needed

 

The attention of interested Consultants is drawn to Section III, paragraphs, 3.14, 3.16, and 3.17 of the World Bank’s “Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers” July 2016 and revised November 2017 and August 2018  (“Procurement Regulations”), setting forth the World Bank’s policy on conflict of interest.

 

A Consultant will be selected in accordance with the Individual Consultant Selection method set out in the Procurement Regulations.

 

The initial assignment is one-year time-based contract, which can be extended upon an agreement between the Consultant and NAWEC.

 

Further information can be obtained at the address below during office hours from 09:00 to 16:00.

 

Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written form to the address below (in person, or by mail, or by fax, or by e-mail) by close of business September 16th, 2020.

 

Managing  Director

Attn: Haddy Njie – Project Coordinator

National Water and Electricity Company Ltd, NAWEC

53 Mamadi Maniyang Highway/Kanifing, Serrekunda

P.O Box: 609, Banjul, The Gambia

Telephone: (+220) 437 62 33

Facsimile Number: (+220) 437 59 90

E-mail: hnjie@nawec.gm (and copy to mfsanyang@nawec.gm

Terms of Reference for International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant

Terms of Reference for

International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant

 

  1. Background

The Republic of the Gambia is implementing Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) and ECOWAS Regional Access Project (ERAP) financed by the World Bank, the European Investment Bank, and the European Union. National Water and Electricity Company (NAWEC) is Implementing Agency for both of these projects. The main Project Development Objectives are increasing the availability and reliability of electricity supply in the Gambia; improving operational performance of NAWEC; improve the capacity of NAWEC to dispatch variable renewable electricity. In June 2020, the World Bank Board approved Additional Financing for GERMP to address, inter alia, urgent needs in improvement of NAWEC water business.

 

NAWEC has set up a Project Management Unit (PMU) to manage the implementation of the projects financed by International Financing Institutions (IFIs), including procurement of goods (equipment and materials), works, and selection of consultants for technical assistance. PMU is also managing contract implementation to ensure compliance with the Financing Agreements. An experienced International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant (the Consultant) will be required to support the PMU in conducting these activities in accordance with the World Bank Guidelines and Project legal documents. The Consultant will also provide on-the-job training and support capacity building of the PMU staff, and perform other related activities, as the need may be.

  1. Objectives

The objectives of the Consultant’s services are to build capacity and support the PMU in implementing procurement and contract management activities outlined in the Project and Financing Agreements, Project Procurement Strategy for Development (PPSD) and Procurement Plan. The Consultant will also provide other services as requested by the PMU and NAWEC management, including advisory for building project management capacity in NAWEC.

  1. Scope of Work

Procurement consultant will assist PMU in performing procurement and contract management activities, which include but are not limited to the following:

  • (i) Developing procurement capacity of NAWEC and PMU, including formal and on-the-job training and coaching procurement staff of the PMU in conducting procurement work in accordance with the World Bank Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers, Goods, Works, Non-Consulting and Consulting Services, July 2016, revised November 2017 and August 2018.
  • (ii) Developing contract management capacity in PMU and NAWEC, including formal and on-the-job training, based on the requirements of the World Bank and in accordance with accepted international practices.
  • (iii) Supporting as requested by NAWEC in building project management capacity, including advising on the organizational structure and business processes. This activity shall be aligned with the ongoing overall restructuring of NAWEC.
  • (iv) Hands-on assistance in performing the following procurement and contract management activities without limitation:
  • Preparation of advertisements for specific tenders.
  • Preparation of Employer’s Requirements, Requests For Bids and Requests For Proposals based on the WB’s standard procurement documents, advising on procurement packaging.
  • Conducting proper communication with bidders, including drafting responses to bidders’ inquiries, debriefing, addressing bidders’ complaints.
  • Training and advising PMU and NAWEC staff on conducting bid/proposal opening session, bid/proposal evaluation, technical and commercial evaluation of bids and proposals, preparing Bid/Proposal Evaluation Reports with recommendations for contract awards.
  • Negotiating finalizing and monitoring contracts with winning bidders/consultants
  • Preparation of contract management plans for large contracts, organizing contract management teams, establishing appropriate processes and communication.
  • Timely submitting to the World Bank and obtaining all necessary approvals/no objection notices.
  • Maintaining procurement tracking system in PMU for monitoring project procurement activities and all procurement clearance processes with the financing institutions. For the projects financed by the World Bank, information exchange and tracking shall be based on STEP.
  • Maintaining procurement filing system to ensure proper record keeping of all procurement-related documentation/records and their availability for the review by the World Bank and the Government.
  • Preparing relevant inputs into regular implementation progress reports by the PMU in part related to procurement.
  • Organize and deliver workshops for NAWEC and other government staff as required.
  • Other procurement and contract management-related activities, as may be requested, from time to time, by the PMU and NAWEC management.

 

It is envisaged that, inter alia, Consultant will be actively involved in managing the following major activities (procurement and/or contract management):

  • Design, supply and installation of Solar PV Plant;
  • Design and Build of HV Transmission infrastructure;
  • Design, supply and installation of the Integrated Management System for NAWEC;
  • Owner’s Engineer to supervise the construction of Solar PV Plant, and Transmission infrastructures;
  • Emergency COVID-19-related procurement activities, including supply of plastic water tanks; water tankers; sanitizing and personal protective materials; etc.;
  • Borehole drilling and rehabilitation services;
  • Rehabilitation of large water tanks;
  • Construction of energy-efficient office building;
  • Various consulting services’ contracts.

 

  1. WORKLOAD and DURATION OF SERVICES

It is estimated that the workload will be 180 staff-days spread over the total contract period of one year (1 November 2020- 31 October 2021). NAWEC, at its discretion, and based on the evaluation of performance, may extend the services.

  1. reporting obligations

Consultant will prepare the following reports:

  • Inception report within one month after contract commencement;
  • Final report upon completion of the services.
    1. Facilities to be provided by the PMU

The following facilities will be provided by the Client to the consultant free of charge.

  • (i) Office space with desk shall be provided in the client’s office or as it may be agreed.
  • (ii) Access to office facilities: printing, photocopying, etc.
  • (iii) Documents: All the documents and available data and information concerning the Project.
  • (iv) Internet facilities within the office.
  • (v) Any site visits that may be required will be arranged by the Client.
  1. Facilities to be provided by the consultant
    • (i) Personal computer and peripherals for his/her use.
    • (ii) Mobile phone and communication (Telephone, internet outside office hours)
    • (iii) In City Transportation.
    • (iv) The consultant will be responsible for arranging and paying for his/her accommodation and meals.
  2. QUALIFICATIONS of the consultant
    • (i) Master’s Degree from a reputable university in procurement, business administration, engineering, economics or related fields. Certification in procurement from a recognized institution (e.g. CIPS) is preferred.
    • (ii) Strong experience in the power sector, including procurement and contract management of large contracts for Design, supply and installation of Plant. Experience in the water sector will be an advantage.
    • (iii) Strong experience and detailed knowledge of the World Bank latest procurement regulations for all main types of procurement: Goods, Works, Plant, Information Systems, Consulting and Non-consulting services.
    • (iv) At least 12 years of proven successful procurement and contract management experience in the World Bank-funded projects in developing countries, including experience in Sub-Saharan Africa. Relevant experience with other multilateral banks (AfDB, ADB, etc) will be also considered. Experience in projects in small and fragile countries will be an advantage.
    • (v) Strong experience in assessment of procurement-related risks, organizational capacity development, training, implementation of procurement systems in project implementation units.
    • (vi) Strong experience in and understanding of international development business, including sensitivity to cultural issues, leadership, communication, negotiations, and project management skills.
    • (vii) Fluent in English with excellent written and spoken skills.

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (CONSULTING SERVICES – INDIVIDUAL CONSULTANT’S SELECTION)

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

(CONSULTING SERVICES –

INDIVIDUAL CONSULTANT’S SELECTION)

 

 

GAMBIA

ELECTRICITY RESTORATION AND MODERNIZATION PROJECT

Grant No.: GRANT NUMBER D309-GM

 

Assignment Title: International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant

Reference No. GM-NAWEC-180787-CSINDV

 

The Government of The Gambia has received financing from the World Bank toward the cost of The Gambia Electricity Restoration and Modernization Project (GERMP) and intends to apply part of the proceeds of these projects for consultant services: International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant. 

 

National Water and Electricity Company (NAWEC) is Implementing Agency for GERMP. The main Project Development Objective is to increase the availability and reliability of electricity supply in the Gambia, and improving the performance of NAWEC. The project is designed to Improve available generation, significantly enhance transmission and distribution network, and reduces losses, together with managerial improvements in NAWEC. In June 2020, the World Bank Board approved additional financing for GERMP Project to include activities aimed at improving the water business of NAWEC.

 

NAWEC has set up a Project Management Unit (PMU) to manage the implementation of the projects financed by the World Bank, including procurement of goods (equipment and materials), works, and selection of consultants for technical assistance. An experienced International Procurement and Contract Management Consultant will be required to provide hands-on support to the PMU in conducting these procurement activities in accordance with the World Bank Guidelines and Project legal documents. The Consultant will also provide on-the-job training and support capacity building of the PMU and NAWEC, and perform other procurement and contract management related activities, as the need may be.

 

The consulting services (“the Services”) include assistance in developing procurement and contract management systems, managing procurement process, maintaining procurement records, drafting procurement documents, evaluation, contract negotiations, contract management, building capacity, providing training to NAWEC staff, and other activities as requested by the PMU Head.

 

It is anticipated that interim services will be provided over the total period of one year.

 

The detailed Terms of Reference (TOR) for the assignment can be obtained at the address given below.

 

NAWEC now invites eligible individual consultants (“Consultants”) to indicate their interest in providing the Services. Interested consultants should provide information demonstrating that they have the required qualifications and relevant experience to perform the Services. Consultant’s Letter of Expression of Interest and CV shall be submitted to the address below. NAWEC will contact only the successful consultant.

 

Required qualifications:

  • (i) Master’s Degree from a reputable university in procurement, business administration, engineering, economics or related fields. Certification in procurement from a recognized institution (e.g. CIPS) is preferred.
  • (ii) Strong experience in the power sector, including procurement and contract management of large contracts for Design, supply and installation of Plant. Experience in the water sector will be an advantage.
  • (iii) Strong experience and detailed knowledge of the World Bank latest procurement regulations for all main types of procurement: Goods, Works, Plant, Information Systems, Consulting and Non-consulting services.
  • (iv) At least 12 years of proven successful procurement and contract management experience in the World Bank-funded projects in developing countries, including experience in Sub-Saharan Africa. Relevant experience with other multilateral banks (AfDB, ADB, etc) will be also considered. Experience in projects in small and fragile countries will be an advantage.
  • (v) Strong experience in assessment of procurement-related risks, project preparation and appraisal, capacity development, training, implementation of procurement systems in project implementation units.
  • (vi) Strong experience in and understanding of international development business, sensitivity to cultural issues, leadership, communication, negotiations, and project management skills.
  • (vii) Fluent in English with excellent written and spoken skills.

 

The attention of interested Consultants is drawn to Section III, paragraphs, 3.14, 3.16, and 3.17 of the World Bank’s “Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers” (July 2016 and revised November 2017 and August 2018) (“Procurement Regulations”), setting forth the World Bank’s policy on conflict of interest.  A Consultant will be selected in accordance with the Individual Consultant selection method set out in the Procurement Regulations.

 

Further information can be obtained at the address below during office hours from 09:00 to 16:00.

 

Expressions of interest must be delivered by e-mail hnjie@nawec.gm,  cc to: mfsanyang@nawec.gm not later than 27th August 2020.

 

Attention: Mrs. Haddy Njie, Project Coordinator

National Water and Electricity Company Ltd, NAWEC

53 Mamadi Maniyang Highway/Kanifing, Serre kunda

P.O Box: 609, Banjul, The Gambia

Telephone: (+220) 437 62 33

Facsimile number: (+220) 437 59 90

E-mail: hnjie@nawec.gm,  cc to: fmsanyang@nawec.gm